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Projects

Fast Tool to Detect Toxic Shellfish

The marine food source and livelihood of tribes and communities along the Pacific coast are threatened by Pseudo-nitzschia blooms that produce domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin. To provide remote communities ...
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Life and Death of a Karenia Bloom in the Western G...

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and pose a threat to human and environmental health. Blooms of Karenia brevis occur nearly annually along the Florida coast which has ...
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Mechanism of Harmful Algal Bloom Initiation in the...

Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, threaten human and ecosystem health and local economies around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the blooms mostly prevail on the west coast of ...
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Microcystins in Bivalves: Optimizing of Monitoring...

This project addresses an emerging concern across the US - the transfer of freshwater algal toxins into the marine environment where they can infiltrate the food web and present a ...
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Multidisciplinary Approach to a Cross-Regional Pro...

Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) has emerged as a significant and expanding seafood safety threat in coastal regions across the United States. The harmful algal species Dinophysis produces toxins known to ...
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Prevalence of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Marine...

Saxitoxins (STXs) produced during Alexandrium Harmful Algal Blooms in Alaska accumulate in shellfish and cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). STXs transfer through zooplankton, forage fish and benthic invertebrates, reaching seabirds ...
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News

Scientists Document Effect of Crude Oil on a Pacif...

Pocillopora damicornis tissue regeneration images following exposure to increasing concentrations of crude oil. Arrows indicate tissue loss at the highest oil concentrations. Credit: May et al., 2020. NCCOS scientists and ...
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How do Light-dependent Mesophotic Corals Survive a...

The ability of deep, light dependent mesophotic corals to grow in low-light conditions is a poorly understood realm of biology. Research, sponsored in part by NCCOS, found that the ability ...
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Exploring Airborne Health Risks from Cyanobacteria...

After a November 2018 finding that one type of airborne blue-green algae toxin was likely inhaled deep into human lungs, Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) researchers, supported by NOAA’s National ...
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NCCOS Leads from Research to Application for Rapid...

Biotechnology that harnesses the natural biochemical systems of animals can be used to detect pathogens and toxins in environmental samples. NCCOS has supported the development of biotechnology to identify harmful ...
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New Indicator for Gulf of Mexico Toxic Alga Shows ...

NCCOS-sponsored scientists have discovered a simple indicator to predict one type of harmful algal species bloom or outbreak. The first potentially reliable biological indicator for forecasting a harmful algal bloom ...
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Blood Monitoring Supports Response and Rehabilitat...

Sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are long-lived animals that are valuable indicator species of environmental health. They are subject to multiple hazards, such as pollutants and natural toxins, ...
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NCCOS delivers ecosystem science solutions for stewardship of the nation’s ocean and coastal resources, in direct support of NOS priorities, offices, and customers, and to sustain thriving coastal communities and economies.

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
1305 East West Highway, Rm 8110
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (240) 533-0300 / Fax: (301) 713-4353
Email: nccos.webcontent@noaa.gov

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