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Projects

Aggression is a Symptom of Domoic Acid Poisoning i...

To gain a better understanding of symptoms experienced by California sea lions caused by the toxin domoic acid, we are studying the relationship between aggression and seizure behavior in laboratory ...
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An Early Warning System for Pseudo-nitzschia Harmf...

Blooms of some species of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produce a neurotoxin that accumulates in shellfish, which can cause illness and even death in humans who eat them. Shellfish managers monitor ...
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Azaspiracid: An Emerging Algal Toxin

Azaspiracids are a group of toxins first reported in the 1990s in Western European waters and are now reported to occur along both the East and West coasts of North ...
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Characterization of an Algicidal Agent Produced by...

We examined a biological control agent isolated from a bacteria species that may provide a mechanism for halting the growth of certain types of toxic dinoflagellate harmful algal blooms. We ...
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Characterization of Toxin Synthesis Pathways in To...

During the past 25 years, the abundance, range, and variety of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins have been increasing, impacting human and marine animal health through consumption of ...
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Ciguatera Fish Poisoning: Identifying Toxic Specie...

Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is the most common, non-bacterial, seafood illness. The condition is caused by toxins from the microalga Gambierdiscus, and can lead to diarrhea, paralysis, and, in worst ...
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Ciguatoxin Impacts on Foraging Behavior in Hawaiia...

Hawaiian monk seals, which are critically endangered, inhabit the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and the Hawaiian Islands. For the first time we have identified the algal toxin ciguatoxin, the cause ...
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Comparative Analysis of Quantitative Detection Met...

We are providing a thorough comparison of two different genetic methods used to quickly count the number of harmful algae present in a water sample. Our results will improve harmful ...
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Complex Interactions Between Harmful Phytoplankton...

We identified how nutrients and exotic zebra mussels interact to promote harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the Great Lakes. Results show the relationship between nutrient loading, herbivore grazing, and HABs ...
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Defining Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

Domoic acid epileptic disease, a central nervous system disorder caused by the algal toxin domoic acid (DA), first showed up in humans in a 1987 shellfish poisoning in Quebec, Canada ...
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News

NCCOS Helps Shellfish Growers Stay Informed on HAB...

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Oyster Farm in Sequim, Washington. Credit: NOAA. NCCOS organized a special session for the 71st Annual Meeting of the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association that addressed ...
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NCCOS Helps Ohio Respond to Unusual Harmful Algal ...

Sites samples along the Maumee River by BGSU, University of Toledo and Defiance College. Credit: NOAA Concerns regarding a large cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (HAB) of Microcystis spp. and Planktothrix spp., ...
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NCCOS Awards $1.7M to Harmful Algal Bloom and Toxi...

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) awarded $1.68M (million) in Fiscal Year 2017 funding for nine research projects to identify conditions increasing bloom toxicity, model toxin movement from ...
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National Harmful Algal Bloom Observing Network Hol...

The National Harmful Algal Bloom Observing Network (NHABON) Working Group recently met to document current HAB observing capabilities and identify outstanding requirements or gaps in existing regional observing networks. During ...
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Portable Red Tide Detector Debuts at NOAA Emerging...

A portable, hand-held instrument that uses genetics to detect the red tide-causing organism Karenia brevis in the field was featured at the second NOAA Emerging Technologies for Observations Workshop. The device, dubbed ...
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Robots Help Locate Origins of Shellfish Toxicity i...

Scientists deployed four underwater robotic Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs) in the Bay of Fundy and the eastern Gulf of Maine at the end of last month. The ESPs count the Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning ...
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Large Summer Harmful Algal Bloom Predicted for Lak...

A satellite view of the 2014 harmful algal bloom on Lake Erie, which the 2017 summer bloom is expected to be similar. Credit: NOAA NOAA and its research partners predict ...
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Why the Exceptional Toxicity during the 2015 West ...

New research sponsored by NCCOS explains what might have caused the high toxicity in Monterey Bay, CA during the massive 2015 toxic bloom of the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia along the ...
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Record-setting Razor Clam Harvest Aided by Pacific...

Recreational razor clam harvesters in Long Beach, Washington, set a record for one-day digger trips (17,800 diggers) on April 30, 2017. The record number of trips was triggered by the ...
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Native Alaskans Trained in Potentially Life-saving...

STAERL staff instruct workshop participants on proper shellfish processing techniques for saxitoxin analysis. Credit: NOAA Recent analyses conducted by the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Environmental Research Laboratory (STAERL) identified lethal ...
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Products

Maps, Tools & Applications

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), sometimes known as “red tide”, occur when certain kinds of algae grow very quickly, forming patches, or “blooms”, in the water. These blooms can emit powerful toxins which endanger human and animal health. NCCOS conducts and funds research that helps communities protect the public and combat blooms in cost-effective ways, and we are breaking new ground in the science of stopping blooms before they occur.
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The NCCOS Geoportal is an online data explorer providing discovery and access to the full catalogue of NCCOS-funded scientific data, including archived data accessions, metadata records, and web services. To discover data, enter a word or phrase in the text box and click on “Search” to conduct a free text search; refine your search using additional options for content type, date, region, and spatial extent. Click on “Browse” to explore the catalogue using topical keywords. Launch the “Map Viewer” to visualise geospatial data (GIS layers) served via mapping web services.
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NCCOS runs the Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) to link volunteers who monitor for marine phytoplankton and HABs in cooperation with professional scientists. We build a more informed public while expanding the reach and resolution of HAB monitoring. Over 200 PMN volunteers sample 140+ sites in 17 states and the US Virgin Islands.
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The Vibrio Predictive Models combine state of the art hydrodynamic models with specific algorithms for Vibrio, to provide early warning of these potential coastal hazards. Knowing where and when to expect elevated concentrations of Vibrio, and environmental conditions that promote rapid growth can inform both management and individual grower harvest decision making in the shellfish industry.
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Data & Reports

Advancing Tools for Modeling, Forecasting and Managing for Vibrio spp. in Washington State

The vast majority of Vibrio-related illnesses in Washington State are associated with a single species, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp). The intent of this workshop was to bring together tribal and non-tribal industry representatives, Federal subject matter experts, State Shellfish Control Authorities, ...
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Biological, chemical, and physical data from the Phytoplankton Monitoring Network from 13 Sep 2001 to 7 Mar 2013 (NODC Accession 0117942)

The Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) is a part of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The PMN was created as an outreach program to connect volunteers and professional scientists in the monitoring of marine phytoplankton and harmful algal ...
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Skill assessment of NOAA’s Chesapeake Bay Vibrio vulnificus model

Since 2012, NOAA has generated model guidance for the probability of occurrence of the harmful marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay. The system employs NOAAs Operational Forecast System for Chesapeake Bay (CBOFS) to force a statistical model developed by ...
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General Pages

ECOHAB

Ecology and Oceanography of HABs (ECOHAB)Toxic Karenia brevis stains the water off South Padre Island, Texas, a rusty red. We fundresearch to understand the biology of harmful algae species and ...
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HAB Forecasts

HAB ForecastsOur HAB forecasts alert coastal managers to blooms before they cause serious damage. Short-term (once or twice weekly) forecasts identify which blooms are potentially harmful, where they are, how ...
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MERHAB

Monitoring and Event Response (MERHAB)Our funding enhances state and regional monitoring with advanced harmful algae detection capabilities, from low-cost shellfish toxin tests to high-tech sensors at sea. (Credit: Washington State ...
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PCMHAB

Prevention, Control, and Mitigation of HABs (PCMHAB)PCMHAB projects identify and evaluate a range of methods, like spraying clay shown here, to eliminate or control blooms of harmful algae in ways ...
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Rapid Response

Rapid ResponseNCCOS's rapid response provides state and local coastal public health and resource managers with ready access to critical data on the types of HAB species and toxins present during ...
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Stressor Impacts and Mitigation

Stressor Impacts & MitigationHarmful Algal BloomsManagers of fisheries, beaches, and water treatment facilities need information on HAB detection and forecasting to plan for and deal with the adverse environmental, economic, ...
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NOAA Internship Opportunities

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NCCOS delivers ecosystem science solutions for stewardship of the nation’s ocean and coastal resources, in direct support of NOS priorities, offices, and customers, and to sustain thriving coastal communities and economies.

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
1305 East West Highway, Rm 8110
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (240) 533-0300 / Fax: (301) 713-4353
Email: nccos.webcontent@noaa.gov