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Projects

An Early Warning System for Pseudo-nitzschia Harmf...

Blooms of some species of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produce a neurotoxin that accumulates in shellfish, which can cause illness and even death in humans who eat them. Shellfish managers monitor ...
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Characterization of an Algicidal Agent Produced by...

We examined a biological control agent isolated from a bacteria species that may provide a mechanism for halting the growth of certain types of toxic dinoflagellate harmful algal blooms. We ...
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Comparative Analysis of Quantitative Detection Met...

We are providing a thorough comparison of two different genetic methods used to quickly count the number of harmful algae present in a water sample. Our results will improve harmful ...
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Differences in the Toxicity of the Alga Gambierdis...

The goal of this project is to advance our understanding of toxins produced by different species of the alga Gambierdiscus and how these toxins and their varieties move through the ...
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Harmful Algal Bloom Detection Instrument Validatio...

We are improving detection of species of the toxin-producing alga Alexandrium in the field by producing highly portable, efficient, and effective biosensors. Alexandrium can be hard to identify and sample, ...
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Harmful Algal Bloom Event Response: Helping New Yo...

Emergency funds from NCCOS allowed New York to monitor algal toxins during a bloom event that coincided with a state spending freeze. Shellfish consumers and the reputation of one of ...
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Harmful Algal Blooms Event Response: Responding to...

We helped Alaska state regulators, the shellfish industry, and community leaders initiate routine, rapid screening of noncommercial shellfish in southeast Alaska for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins. We also worked ...
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Improving the Gulf of Maine HAB Forecast with Envi...

Toxic algal blooms pose a serious health risk and often disrupt valuable regional shellfisheries. Eating seafood tainted with algal toxins can sicken or even kill people. We are pioneering use ...
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Improving Tools for Monitoring Multiple HAB Toxins...

The impacts of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) toxins are an emerging public health and environmental issue in brackish and marine ecosystems, yet coastal harmful algal bloom (HAB) monitoring programs to date ...
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Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Bl...

Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms in the Lower Great Lakes (MERHAB-LGL) was the first regional, multi-institution project to examine toxic cyanobacteria in the lower Great Lakes and ...
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News

NCCOS Helps Shellfish Growers Stay Informed on HAB...

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Oyster Farm in Sequim, Washington. Credit: NOAA. NCCOS organized a special session for the 71st Annual Meeting of the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association that addressed ...
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NCCOS Helps Ohio Respond to Unusual Harmful Algal ...

Sites samples along the Maumee River by BGSU, University of Toledo and Defiance College. Credit: NOAA Concerns regarding a large cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (HAB) of Microcystis spp. and Planktothrix spp., ...
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National Harmful Algal Bloom Observing Network Hol...

The National Harmful Algal Bloom Observing Network (NHABON) Working Group recently met to document current HAB observing capabilities and identify outstanding requirements or gaps in existing regional observing networks. During ...
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Gulf of Maine Red Tide Monitoring Provides Real-ti...

Figure 1: Depiction of Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) and buoy configured for deployment in the Gulf of Maine. Credit: WHOI From late April to early July 2016, the National Centers ...
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Record-setting Razor Clam Harvest Aided by Pacific...

Recreational razor clam harvesters in Long Beach, Washington, set a record for one-day digger trips (17,800 diggers) on April 30, 2017. The record number of trips was triggered by the ...
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Second ‘Cytobot’ Deployed in Texas Har...

NCCOS-funded investigators from Texas A&M University (TAMU) successfully deployed an Imaging Flow Cytobot (IFCB) on a pier near Freeport, Texas. This is the second cytobot deployed in the Gulf of ...
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NCCOS Responds to Southern California Harmful Alga...

Starting late March- early April 2017, researchers, managers, and animal response networks working in Southern California coastal communities noted an increase in wildlife impacts consistent with the onset of a ...
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NCCOS Research Featured in EPA Harmful Algal Bloom...

Southwestern states and Pacific Islands are experiencing increasing occurrences of harmful algal blooms in both coastal ocean and freshwater bodies. Recently the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in collaboration with ...
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Small Bloom Predicted for Gulf of Maine Red Tide i...

NCCOS and WHOI scientists prepare a sediment corer to collect Alexandrium cysts last fall for the 2017 forecast. Credit: NOAA. This summer's red tide in the Gulf of Maine is ...
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Renewed Interest to Study Ciguatera Risks in Papah...

Dr. Alison Robertson, an NCCOS ECOHAB sponsored ciguatera expert with the University of South Alabama and Dauphin Island Sea Lab (USA\DISL), is helping the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries ...
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General Pages

Rapid Response

Rapid ResponseNCCOS's rapid response provides state and local coastal public health and resource managers with ready access to critical data on the types of HAB species and toxins present during ...
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NOAA Internship Opportunities

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NCCOS delivers ecosystem science solutions for stewardship of the nation’s ocean and coastal resources, in direct support of NOS priorities, offices, and customers, and to sustain thriving coastal communities and economies.

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
1305 East West Highway, Rm 8110
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (240) 533-0300 / Fax: (301) 713-4353
Email: nccos.webcontent@noaa.gov