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NCCOS Partners with White House to Improve Detection of Excess Nutrients in Aquatic Environments

Earlier this month, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and other partners joined the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC for a workshop to accelerate the development and adoption of nutrient sensors. Excessive amounts of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) entering lakes, rivers, streams, and coastal waters are causing […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful algae responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this algae’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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NOAA Completes Extensive Study on Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary

A recently completed three year assessment of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) is the first to comprehensively describe fish and benthic communities across the full depth range of the sanctuary (60-400’).  Fish and benthic community information collected by three complementary techniques were employed to collect biological information to address the potential impacts of fishing activities […]

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NOAA Facilitates Regional Consensus On Lionfish Harvesting Strategies

First reported in the 1980s, the venomous Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois miles and P. volitans) is widely established along the Southeast U.S. and Caribbean. Now invading the Gulf of Mexico and South America, estimates of lionfish densities indicate lionfish even surpassed some native species. Lionfish could permanently impact native reef fish communities, as they occupy the […]

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Incorporating Shoreline Fluctuations into Tidal Models Improves Sea Level Predictions

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science demonstrates the importance of incorporating dynamic shoreline changes into models over time to forecast sea level change impacts. Projected sea level change impacts are often depicted by assuming coastlines migrate unaltered over time with the rising or falling sea level. While valid for hard, rocky shorelines, […]

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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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Algal Toxins Pose Health Risk to Dogs

Harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, including microcystins, pose health threats and even death for dogs and other pets exposed to the contaminated water, explains a new educational brochure from the New York Sea Grant Program. The brochure, a product of a National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science sponsored research project in the Great Lakes, describes freshwater HABs and their […]

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NOAA Supports Reduction in Gulf of Mexico Nutrient Loading

From August 12 – 14, seven of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife-led Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) convened a workshop in Memphis, Tennessee to improve the allocation of wildlife management actions throughout the Mississippi River Basin in a way that reduces nutrient loading and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, while balancing agricultural interests and supporting terrestrial […]

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