You are here: Home / News /

Latest News and Feature Stories

Water Quality Improvements Through Shellfish Aquaculture Highlighted in NOAA Science Seminar Series

A recent presentation highlighted a new NCCOS modeling study in Long Island Sound (LIS) and Great Bay Piscataqua Regional Estuaries (GBP) that focused on the water quality benefits of shellfish aquaculture. The presentation, “Eutrophication and Aquaculture; Shellfish can help the Bay!,”reported nitrogen removal estimates through cultivation of oysters equivalent to 1% of total nutrient inputs discharged […]

Continue reading

Puget Sound Harmful Algal Blooms Linked to Seasonal Patterns and Survival Probability

In order to predict blooms and prevent undue economic loss of commercial shellfish in Puget Sound, NCCOS has sponsored research investigating the seasonal patterns and mechanisms of bloom formation of Alexandrium, a dinoflagellate that contaminates shellfish and causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans. The study shows Alexandrium survives and spreads in Puget Sound in response to […]

Continue reading

NOAA Shepherds Transition of Gulf of Maine Harmful Algal Bloom Model to Operational Forecast System

NOAA and partners are working to transition a harmful algal bloom (HAB) model for Alexandrium  fundyense in the Gulf of Maine (GoM) into a NOAA operational forecast system (OFS), which would help minimize economic losses to a $200-300 million dollar a year shellfish industry in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. A. fundyense is a dinoflagellate phytoplankton that produces […]

Continue reading

Expedition Marks Twelve Years of Discovery in the Caribbean

Scientists recently completed the 12th year of a research expedition to map seafloor habitats in the U.S. Caribbean aboard the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster. Researchers mapped nearly 200,000 underwater acres along St. Croix and St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands and completed 35 remotely operated vehicle dives. Key findings include the identification of three seamounts rising 25 […]

Continue reading

Regional Water Management Practices Reduce Biscayne Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

In subtropical Biscayne Bay, Florida, NCCOS research reveals decades of water management practices reduce freshwater flow, negatively impacting abundance and composition of the bay’s nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) communities, fish, and crustaceans. Over the last 50 years, a massive water management system modified the hydrology of the South Florida watershed by altering the quantity, […]

Continue reading

NOAA Hollings Scholar Receives Multiple Awards

Jeffrey Good, a NOAA Hollings Scholar who interned at NCCOS’s Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research (CCEHBR) last summer, was recently awarded a prestigious grant from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Jeff will be traveling to Semarang, Indonesia to work with Dr. Budi Widianarko, an environmental scientist and food technician at Soegijapranata Catholic University. […]

Continue reading

Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Models Improved by Innovative Measurement of Coastal Marsh Elevation

Coastal marsh elevation, a measurement used in models to predict impacts of sea level rise and periodic flooding from storm surge, is commonly determined by remote sensing methods that have been found to overestimate marsh platform height. In order to address this inaccuracy, known as a “saturation problem” caused by dense vegetation, NOAA’s National Centers of […]

Continue reading

Phytoplankton Monitoring Network Highlighted during National Volunteer Week

Public participation in scientific research is a growing trend. Citizen science, as it is called, typically involves data collection by members of the public who pass their information along to researchers trying to answer real-world questions. In support of National Volunteer Week (April 12–18), the National Ocean Service ran a social media campaign this week highlighting […]

Continue reading