Home > news > NCCOS Scientist Receives Prestigious ‘Gears of Government’ Award

NCCOS Scientist Receives Prestigious ‘Gears of Government’ Award

Published on: 05/13/2019
Primary Contact(s): steven.thur@noaa.gov

Dr. Greg Doucette from the NCCOS Charleston Laboratory in South Carolina, along with his two NOAA teammates, received the celebrated 2019 Gears of Government President’s Award.

Dr. Greg Doucette (left) explains harmful algal bloom detection and monitoring technology to Senator Jerry Moran (Kansas) during the senator’s visit to the NCCOS Charleston Laboratory in South Carolina, on May 3, 2019. To the right, sits an Environmental Sample Processor. Credit: Sean Morton, NOAA NCCOS.

Dr. Doucette, Dr. Timothy Davis (formerly NOAA/GLERL), and Dr. Stephanie Moore (NOAA/NMFS) are being honored for radically advancing rapid and remote detection of harmful algal bloom toxins to ensure the delivery of safe drinking water in Lake Erie and access to safe seafood in the state of Washington.

The team developed a toxin sensor that was deployed on state-of-the-art, underwater robots called Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs) that, for the first time, transmitted near–real-time measurements of toxins in water. The cutting-edge technology markedly advances the protection of public and economic health in U.S. coastal communities.

Doucette’s team was the only one of 17 Department of Commerce nominations this year to receive the Gears of Government President’s Award. The Executive Office of the President launched the “Gears of Government Awards” to honor federal employees who are delivering exceptional products and services to the American people.

Deploying an Environmental Sample Processor in Lake Erie. Credit: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL).

 

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