Home > news > Podcast Explores Economics of Natural vs Armored Shorelines along Oregon Coast

Podcast Explores Economics of Natural vs Armored Shorelines along Oregon Coast

Published on: 01/28/2021
Primary Contact(s): felix.martinez@noaa.gov

Some oceanfront landowners in Neskowin, Oregon, have chosen to use rock revetments, or rip-rap, to protect their properties from erosion. Their decision has implications for property values, public access, and recreation. Credit Steven Dundas, OSU.

The American Shoreline Podcast Network recently interviewed Dr. Steve Dundas, a NCCOS supported research scientist at Oregon State University. Dr. Dundas leads a NCCOS project studying the value of ecosystem services provided by green coastal infrastructure.

The podcast discusses Oregon’s Goal 18, which focused on preserving unarmored shorelines but grandfathered the existing state’s coastal properties at the time of its adoption. As a result, around half of current homes in exposed shorelines are either already armored or have the ability to do so whereas the others cannot. This ability to armor has a major impact on property values (e.g., decreasing the value of adjacent, non-armored property), in turn leading to litigation and social and political conflicts.

Dr. Dundas’ work will be key as Oregon reviews the long-term impacts of Goal 18 and sets new policies to both accommodate the needs of property owners and preserving the state’s natural coastline features. He has been invited by the state to present during the ongoing public hearings that will determine the future of Goal 18 policies.

This effort is part of the NCCOS socioeconomics project A Multidisciplinary, Integrative Approach to Valuing Ecosystem Services from Natural Infrastructure.

Credit ASPN/Coastal News Today, Inc.

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