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2017 California Estuary Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring Begins

Last month, NCCOS-sponsored scientists began harmful algae and algal toxin monitoring in California estuaries. The monitoring is part of a collaborative NOAA–state response to recent research showing that a mixture of marine and freshwater toxins can reside in estuarine waters. The research found that this toxic “cocktail” could also be fatal to shellfish, sea otters, […]

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California Mapping Initiative Identifies Priority Areas of Seafloor

Bathymetric and seafloor information is critical for decision-making in a number of marine management fields, including navigational safety, fisheries, renewable energy, oil and gas extraction, and ecological conservation. Prior to a recent effort to identify information gaps in seafloor mapping data in Southern California, only 13 percent of the region out to the Exclusive Economic Zone Line […]

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Price of Shrimp Impacted by Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone”

The low oxygen conditions slow shrimp growth, leading to fewer and more expensive large shrimp A NOAA-funded study led by Duke University has found that the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” drives up the price of large shrimp relative to small shrimp, creating an economic impact that directly affects consumers, fishermen and seafood markets. The […]

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Nutrient Crediting of Oyster Aquaculture in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS scientist, Suzanne Bricker, spoke at the 2017 East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo seminar program on January 14, 2017. Collaborating with Maryland Sea Grant, the presentation ‘Oyster Best Management Practices: What does it mean for growers?’ highlighted the recently approved recommendations for crediting oyster tissue for nutrient removal as a Best Management Practice (BMP), […]

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Winners and Losers in the California Current under Future Ocean Acidification

A NOAA-supported study projects that Dungeness crab and some commercial finfish species living on the sea floor may decline in future years due to increased ocean acidification in the California Current. These estimates were based on computer models forecasting changes in the California Current ocean ecosystem, which includes an expected rise in summer ocean acidification […]

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Risk of Toxic Shellfish on West Coast Increases with Water Temperature

High levels of domoic acid, a shellfish toxin, are correlated with warmer ocean temperatures offshore of Oregon and Washington. An NCCOS-supported research team led by scientists from Oregon State University, the University of Oregon, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife found an association between domoic acid levels in shellfish and climate-scale warm ocean […]

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2016 Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia Forecast is Close to Mark

As predicted by an earlier forecast sponsored by NCCOS, dissolved oxygen conditions in Maryland’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay main channel continued to be average for most of the summer of 2016. In mid-June, NCCOS issued the annual hypoxic zone forecasts for the Chesapeake Bay, predicting a close to average sized hypoxic volume for the bay […]

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New Guidance for Managing HAB Impacts on California Fisheries

A newly released report from the California Ocean Science Trust highlights efforts to learn from the 2015 massive bloom of the toxin-producing marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia that formed off the U.S. West Coast. The harmful algal bloom (HAB) impacted key fisheries, such as Dungeness crabs and razor clams, and marine mammals from California to Alaska. NOAA […]

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