Home > Explore Data & Reports > Support for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserves System (NERRS), Volume I: The Impacts of Coastal Development on the Ecology and Human Wellbeing of Tidal Creek Ecosystems of the US Southeast

Citation:

Sanger, D., A. Blair, G. DiDonato, T. Washburn, S. Jones, R. Chapman, D. Bergquist, G. Riekerk, E. Wirth, J. Stewart, D. White, L. Vandiver, S. White, and D. Whitall. 2008. Support for Integrated Ecosystem Assessments of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserves System (NERRS), Volume I: The Impacts of Coastal Development on the Ecology and Human Wellbeing of Tidal Creek Ecosystems of the US Southeast. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 82. Charleston, SC. 76 pp.

Data/Report Type:

NOAA Technical Memorandum

Description

A study was conducted, in association with the Sapelo Island and North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRs), to evaluate the impacts of coastal development on sentinel habitats (e.g., tidal creek ecosystems), including potential impacts to human health and well-being. Uplands associated with southeastern tidal creeks and the salt marshes they drain are popular locations for building homes, resorts, and recreational facilities because of the high quality of life and mild climate associated with these environments. Tidal creeks form part of the estuarine ecosystem characterized by high biological productivity, great ecological value, complex environmental gradients, and numerous interconnected processes. This research combined a watershed-level study integrating ecological, public health and human dimension attributes with watershed-level land use data. The approach used for this research was based upon a comparative watershed and ecosystem approach that sampled tidal creek networks draining developed watersheds (e.g., suburban, urban, and industrial) as well as undeveloped sites. The primary objective of this work was to clearly define the relationships between coastal development with its concomitant land use changes and non-point source pollution loading and the ecological and human health and well-being status of tidal creek ecosystems.

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