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2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting Showcases NCCOS Research

Published on: 04/06/2016
Research Area(s): Coastal Change
Primary Contact(s): elizabeth.turner@noaa.gov

The 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting this past winter featured the research of NCCOS scientists and sponsored principal investigators. Topics included ocean acidification, hypoxia, blue carbon, and harmful algal blooms. NCCOS scientists and sponsored researchers gave 24 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired sixspecial sessions.

The biennial Ocean Sciences Meeting consists of a diverse program covering topics in all areas of the ocean sciences discipline. A record attendance of approximately 6,000 people attended the 2016 meeting held in New Orleans, Louisiana.

ocean sciences

The 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting was held at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Courtesy and copyright AGU and the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA

The 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting was held at the New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Courtesy and copyright AGU andErnest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, Louisiana.

NCCOS-supported sessions and presentations included:

Blue Carbon

Blue Carbon for How Long? Lability of Buried Salt Marsh Carbon Released via Erosion (Carolyn Currin et al.)

Conservation, Education, and Outreach

Using Telepresence and New Learning Platforms for Engagement in Ocean Exploration (Peter Etnoyer et al.)

Measuring Habitat Quality for Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges to Add Conservation Value to Telepresence-Enabled Science and Technology (Peter Etnoyer, Mark Monaco et al.)

Deep-Sea Corals

Stable Isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) in Two Depth-Segregated Species of Deep-Sea Gorgonian Octocorals from the Eastern Pacific (Peter Etnoyer et al)

Harmful Algal Blooms

From Research to Operations: Transitioning NOAA’S Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom Forecast System (Karen Kavanaugh, Richard Stumpf)

LANDSAT- Derived 28-Year History of Phytoplankton Blooms in Western Lake Erie Shows Changes in Peak Bloom Timing and Challenges Due to Phytoplankton Species Variability (Richard Stumpf et al.)

Simulation of Advection and Vertical Distribution of Buoyant Cyanobacterial Colonies in Lake Erie With a Lagrangian Particle Model for Short-Term Forecasts of Harmful Algal Blooms (Mark Rowe, Eric Anderson, Timothy Wynne, Richard Stumpf)

Gulf of Mexico Loop Current Interactions with the West Florida Shelf and its Influence on Harmful Algae Blooms (Yonggang Liu, Robert Weisberg)

Molecular Quantification of the Florida Red Tide Dinoflagellate and the Development of Low Cost, Volunteer-attended Handheld Sensor Networks (Dana Nieuwkerk, Robert Ulrich, John Paul, Katherine Hubbard)

Phytoplankton Modeling with an Imaging FlowCytobot: More Than Just HABs (Darren Henrichs, Lisa Campbell)

What Factors Explain Harmful Algal Blooms of Dinophysis Along the Texas Coast? (Lauren Replogle, Darren Henrichs, Lisa Campbell)

High Resolution Time Series of Plankton Communities: From Early Warning of Harmful Blooms to Sentinels of Climate Change (Heidi Sosik, Lisa Campbell, Robert Olson)

Why Was the 2012 Bloom so Early? Using Chilling and Warming Metrics to Resolve Interannual Variability in the Timing of Alexandrium fundyense Bloom Initiation (Alexis Fischer, Donald Anderson, Stephanie Moore, Michael Brosnahan)

Contribution of Cell Mortality to the Decline of a Toxic Dinoflagellate Bloom (Deana Erdner, Chang Jae Choi, Michael Brosnahan, Taylor Sehein)

Multi-Omics Profiling of Phytoplankton Community Metabolism: Linking Meta-Transcriptomics and Metabolomics to Elucidate Phytoplankton Physiology in a Model Coastal System (Elizabeth Kujawinski, Krista Longnecker, Harriet Alexander, Sonya Dyhrman, Bethany Jenkins, Tatiana Rynearson)

The Impacts of a Massive Harmful Algal Bloom Along the US West Coast in 2015 (Raphael Kudela, Vera Trainer, Ryan McCabe, Barbara Hickey, Kendra Negrey)

Multi-Bacterial Influences on Diatom Bloom and Toxigenesis (Marilou Sison-Mangus, Sunny Jiang, Raphael Kudela, Sanjin Mehic)

Hypoxia and Ocean Acidification

Ocean Deoxygenation: Integrating Coastal and Oceanic Perspectives in a Changing World I (Denise Breitburg, Lisa Levin, Brad Seibel, Michael Roman)

Ocean Deoxygenation: Integrating Coastal and Oceanic Perspectives in a Changing World II (Denise Breitburg, Lisa Levin, Brad Seibel, Michael Roman)

Ocean Deoxygenation: Integrating Coastal and Oceanic Perspectives in a Changing World III Posters (Denise Breitburg, Lisa Levin, Brad Seibel, Michael Roman)

Nutrient-Enhanced Coastal Acidification and Hypoxia and Other Anthropogenic Impacts on Biogeochemical Processes I (John Lehrter, Wei-Jun Cai, Richard Rivkin, Nainzhi Jiao)

Nutrient-Enhanced Coastal Acidification and Hypoxia and Other Anthropogenic Impacts on Biogeochemical Processes II Posters (John Lehrter, Richard Rivkin, Louis Legendre, Jason Grear)

Nutrient-Enhanced Coastal Acidification and Hypoxia and Other Anthropogenic Impacts on Biogeochemical Processes III (John Lehrter, Cheryl Brown, M. Robin Anderson, Jason Grear, Louis Legendre, Wei-Jun Cai, Richard Rivkin, Nianzhi Jiao)

Integrated Ecosystem Science

Using Integrated Ecosystem Observations from Gulf Watch Alaska to Assess the Effects of the 2014/2015 Pacific Warm Anomaly in the Northern Gulf of Alaska (Kris Holderied, Tammy Neher et al.)

For more information, contact Rob.Magnien@noaa.gov or Elizabeth.Turner@noaa.gov.

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