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News and Features by Region Alabama Archives - News and Features

Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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Could Future Land Use Changes Increase Storm Surge Flooding?

Scientists funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science have found that projected changes in coastal Gulf of Mexico land use and land cover could increase the extent of storm surge flooding by up to 70 percent above flooding from projected sea level rise alone. Using a newly developed predictive model, the University of […]

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Common Brevetoxin Metabolite Found in Gulf of Mexico Oysters May Not be a Health Risk

Brevetoxin B2—an abundant shellfish metabolite of brevetoxin found in Gulf of Mexico oysters—does not readily pass through an intestinal barrier, rendering it unlikely to cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The B2 metabolite is produced by oysters and many other animals by attaching the amino acid cysteine to the brevetoxin that is consumed by shellfish during blooms […]

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Sea Level Rise Research Supports Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative

An NCCOS-funded study is investigating the ecological effects of sea level rise in the Gulf of Mexico. The effort is the focal point of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, a federal–state partnership established to advance sea level rise prediction and assessment capabilities. The cooperative seeks to improve coastal data and research products […]

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Research Shows Shellfish Metabolism of Red Tide Toxin Can Change the Outcome of Poisoning

As recent as 2012, the State of Texas was impacted by the longest red tide on record, leading to the collapse of its oyster industry and  the Governor to seek disaster assistance from the U. S. Department of Commerce. A new study published in the American Chemical Society journal: Chemical Research in Toxicology shows that in animals the […]

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Spring Floods May Increase This Year’s Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

To develop an earlier prediction of the size of the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” this summer, NOAA’s National Weather Service and National Ocean Service combined data from the National Hydrologic Assessment U.S. Spring Flood Risk Outlook with knowledge of soil saturation and typical weather patterns throughout the Mississippi watershed this year. Based on estimates of flood risk, snow pack, […]

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Recreational Water Pathogen Detection Workshops Build Skills for State Labs

The North Carolina Biotechnology Center funded NOAA and academic researchers to develop a training facility for public health officials and resource managers in advanced molecular methods to detect pathogens and harmful algae species more quickly and effectively. The first workshop, held March 11 – 15, 2013,  covered quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques to detect Enterococcus, the […]

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Mercury Levels in the Gulf of Mexico Quantified in NOAA Report

On August 29, researchers at the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) published an analysis of NOAA Mussel Watch Program contaminant monitoring data for mercury and methylmercury levels and distributions around the Gulf of Mexico. Data gathered from oyster and sediment samples from Texas to Florida revealed relatively elevated mercury concentrations (hotspots) in the […]

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