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Florida Keys marine reserve a keeper: Fish rebounding – NBC Science blog

Published on: 02/12/2013
Research Area(s): Marine Spatial Ecology
Region(s) of Study: U.S. States and Territories / Florida

Both fishermen and fish species have benefited from “no-take” protections at a marine reserve in the Florida Keys, according to a government report.

The report found that overfished species – including red and black grouper, yellowtail and mutton snapper – have increased in abundance and size inside the reserve and throughout the area, according to a statement from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In other words, there are more, and bigger, fish.

The mutton snapper, once thought to be fished into oblivion in the area, has also been spotted spawning inside the Tortugas Ecological Reserve, which is part of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, the release noted.

Meanwhile, commercial catches of reef-dwelling fish in the area have increased, and continue to rise, according to the statement.

via Florida Keys marine reserve a keeper: Fish rebounding – NBC Science blog.

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