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Projects

DinoSHIELD: A Slow-release Natural Algicide Produc...

We will field test an environmentally neutral method to control harmful algal blooms. Our work will provide managers with information on the applications of a natural algicide as an environmentally ...
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ECOHAB: GOMTOX: Dynamics of Alexandrium fundyense ...

Extensive shellfish resources in the Gulf of Maine are frequently contaminated with toxins produced by the red tide dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. Shellfish harvesting must be closed to protect public health ...
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Emerging Algal Toxins in the California Current Sy...

Surveys in California have highlighted the occurrence of HAB toxins in estuarine waters and shellfish, but there is concern that current monitoring approaches under-report the threats. There is a need ...
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Estimating Economic Losses and Impacts of Florida ...

We are examining the economic impacts of Karenia brevis events across 80 different economic sectors, based on varied bloom occurrence and intensity. Understanding the true costs of harmful algal blooms ...
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Evaluation of Mitigation Strategies for Harmful Al...

We will assess the potential economic benefits of mitigation strategies for harmful algal blooms in the Dungeness crab fishery along the U.S. West Coast. Why We Care In 2015, the ...
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Expanding ISSC Validated Options for Monitoring Di...

In the U.S., the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) establish methods of toxin analysis to regulate shellfish, and the National Shellfish Sanitation Program ...
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Expanding the Southeast Alaska Tribal Ocean Resear...

This project expands existing harmful algal bloom (HAB) monitoring conducted by the Sitka Tribe of Alaska Environmental Research Laboratory (STAERL) to include testing shellfish for domoic acid and diarrhetic shellfish ...
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HABON-NE, An Adaptive Observing Network for Real-T...

New England coastal waters have long been impacted by Alexandrium, a species that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning. Other species have recently emerged in the Gulf of Maine, including Pseudo-nitzschia and ...
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Harmful Algal Bloom Community Technology Accelerat...

The project team will establish a California regional hub for harmful algal bloom data, technology, and knowledge transfer, and then expand or export these technological tools to other regions on ...
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How will Climate Change Affect Harmful Algal Speci...

We are supporting research that will determine how future increases in temperature and ocean acidity will affect harmful algal bloom species (HABs) and their grazers. Light micrograph of Karlodinium veneficum ...
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News

Public Reporting Tool Helps Long Island’s Suffolk ...

Brown tides and other harmful algal blooms (HABs) are becoming a recurrent seasonal issue in the coastal waters of New York’s Suffolk County. A NCCOS brown tide research project provided ...
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Reviews of Our Current Understanding of Harmful Di...

In a recently released book on dinoflagellates, three chapters update knowledge of and changing views for the red tide alga Karenia brevis and the estuarine Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates Pfiesteria piscicida and ...
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Marine Heatwaves Fuel Harmful Algal Blooms Off US ...

Recreational razor clamming can bring thousands of visitors to the Washington coast. Toxins concentrated in razor clam and Dungeness crab fisheries have caused economic damage to coastal communities. Repeated marine ...
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NCCOS Supports Expansion of Red Tide Respiratory F...

This photo, taken while conducting aerial surveys for manatee conservation studies, clearly shows red tide off Florida’s Southwest coastline during the 2017–2019 bloom. Credit: Mote Marine Laboratory’s Manatee Research Program ...
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HAB Toxin of Unknown Origin Linked to a Dinoflagel...

Dinophysis norvegica. Credit WHOI. The biological source of Dihydrodinopyhysistoxin-1 (aka dihydro-DTX1), a toxin that causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning and once described from a marine sponge, is of yet unknown. In ...
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Newly Deployed NCCOS Domoic Acid Sensor Detects To...

Working with colleagues at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), NCCOS scientists have calibrated and deployed NCCOS-developed domoic acid (DA) sensors on two Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs). These 2020 dockside ...
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Linking Chlorophyll Concentration and Wind Pattern...

The California Current System (CCS) is a highly productive region because of wind driven upwelling which supplies nutrients to the euphotic zone. Few studies have compared upwelling and algae blooms ...
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Scientists Complete Annual Gulf of Maine Sampling ...

Preparing for another station of CTD profiling and sediment coring on NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow. Credit: Steve Kibler, NOAA NCCOS. NCCOS scientists and their partners recently completed the annual ...
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2020 Lake Erie Algal Bloom was Mild, as Predicted ...

Truecolor image of the Microcystis cyanobacteria bloom in western Lake Erie on August 22, 2020, produced using data derived from Copernicus Sentinel-3 data provided by EUMETSAT. October marked the end ...
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Southeast Alaska Tribes Trained Virtually to Detec...

NCCOS’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network trained over 30 environmental tribal personnel from Southeast Alaska and Kodiak Island in toxic phytoplankton sampling and identification. The training took part during the 8th Annual ...
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