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NCCOS Personnel Receive Emergency Response Training

NCCOS scientists participated in the first NOAA “300 level” course titled: “Intermediate Incident Command System Training” last month in Silver Spring, MD in preparation for agency-wide response to natural or man-made emergency incidents or to deploy to an emergency or disaster center. The Incident Command System (ICS) was developed to respond to emergencies using standard job roles, forms, and […]

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NOAA Student Scholars Present Summer Research With NCCOS

Ten student undergraduate scholars, most with the NOAA Educational Partnership Program and Hollings Scholarship Program, are interning this summer with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Silver Spring, MD, Oxford, MD, Beaufort, NC, and Charleston, SC. Their internship programs culminated with presentations by each scholar of their summer research at the Science and […]

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Seaweed “Super Sucker”¯ Helping Restore Hawaii’s Kaneohe Bay

From 1998 to 2014, NCCOS supported the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative (HCRI) to fund research on Hawaii’s coral reefs, including invasive algae and seaweed control measures. One outcome was the “Super Sucker”¯ in partnership with State of Hawaii and the Nature Conservancy (TNC) to remove invasive algae from Hawaii coral reefs and lagoons; the Super Sucker was […]

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Living Shorelines Provide Better Fish Habitats

In many places, estuarine shorelines are protected from erosion by riprap–a jumble of rock and other hard materials piled along the shore. More recently, living shorelines¯ have become the focus of study as an alternative approach that preserves ecological function as well as providing shoreline protection. For example, riprap-sill structures are a type of living shoreline¯ combining a rock […]

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Invasive Reed Prefers Altered Shorelines

An NCCOS-funded study found that the invasive non-native variety of the common reed Phragmites australis in the Chesapeake Bay estuary thrives around altered and hardened shorelines and disturbed marshes and beaches with elevated nutrients. The research team also concluded that native Spartina marsh plant communities will struggle under this invasion without management action. The seven-year project […]

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Gulf of Mexico Phytoplankton Communities Altered after Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

On April 20, 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil drilling platform released millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, making it the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history with documented negative impacts to zooplankton, fish, birds, sea turtles, and marine mammals. Now, new research partially funded by NCCOS has disclosed negative impacts […]

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Why Nutrient-Enriched Waters Favor Large Single-Cell Algae

Ecological studies show that bottom-up (e.g., nutrient input) and top-down (e.g., grazing/predation) pressures may change the structure of aquatic ecosystems with “cascading” effects throughout the food chain. Recent research supports that zooplankton grazing in high-nutrient waters promotes the growth of larger phytoplankton over smaller species, creating a higher abundance of these larger single celled algae within the food web. Using samples […]

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NOAA and Louisiana Collaborate on Mississippi River Diversion Management

The 5th Annual NOAA/Northern Gulf Institute Gulf Hypoxia Research Coordination Workshop brought together Louisiana state officials, federal and other state agencies, NGOs, and academic scientists with interests in identifying a path forward to restore Louisiana’s coastal wetlands, reduce the size of the annual Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, and sustain the ecological and socioeconomic benefits of […]

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