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Nutrient Crediting of Oyster Aquaculture in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS scientist, Suzanne Bricker, spoke at the 2017 East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo seminar program on January 14, 2017. Collaborating with Maryland Sea Grant, the presentation ‘Oyster Best Management Practices: What does it mean for growers?’ highlighted the recently approved recommendations for crediting oyster tissue for nutrient removal as a Best Management Practice (BMP), […]

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New Guidance for Managing HAB Impacts on California Fisheries

A newly released report from the California Ocean Science Trust highlights efforts to learn from the 2015 massive bloom of the toxin-producing marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia that formed off the U.S. West Coast. The harmful algal bloom (HAB) impacted key fisheries, such as Dungeness crabs and razor clams, and marine mammals from California to Alaska. NOAA […]

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Experts Shape the Future of Caribbean Coral Restoration Science and Practice

Adapted text from Tali Vardi Coral restoration scientists, practitioners, and resource managers gathered at the Workshop to Advance the Science and Practice of Caribbean Coral Restoration in Fort Lauderdale, FL last month to address the rapidly expanding and evolving role of active coral restoration in the management of coral reef ecosystems. The three-day meeting facilitated […]

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Panel Releases First Recommendations on Oyster Aquaculture Practices that Reduce Nutrients in Chesapeake Bay

This week the Chesapeake Bay Program and its partners approved the Oyster Best Management Practices Expert Panel’s first recommendations on specific oyster aquaculture practices that remove excess nitrogen and phosphorus from Chesapeake Bay. The recommendations are intended to become best management practices in support of the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, pollution limits established by the U.S. […]

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NCCOS Supports Oyster Shell Recycling Program in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS’s Cooperative Oxford Laboratory in Oxford, Maryland, recently joined the Oyster Recovery Partnership’s Shell Recycling Alliance by installing oyster shell recycling bins at the lab. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Oyster Disease Research Program, which under a partnership with NCCOS is housed at the Oxford laboratory, evaluates shellfish health in support of Chesapeake […]

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Living Shorelines Provide Better Fish Habitats

In many places, estuarine shorelines are protected from erosion by riprap–a jumble of rock and other hard materials piled along the shore. More recently, living shorelines¯ have become the focus of study as an alternative approach that preserves ecological function as well as providing shoreline protection. For example, riprap-sill structures are a type of living shoreline¯ combining a rock […]

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Invasive Reed Prefers Altered Shorelines

An NCCOS-funded study found that the invasive non-native variety of the common reed Phragmites australis in the Chesapeake Bay estuary thrives around altered and hardened shorelines and disturbed marshes and beaches with elevated nutrients. The research team also concluded that native Spartina marsh plant communities will struggle under this invasion without management action. The seven-year project […]

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NCCOS Informs Michigan Decision Against Great Lakes Net-Pen Aquaculture

The Michigan Departments of Agriculture and Rural Development, National Resources, and Environmental Quality have decided not to allow siting of net-pen aquaculture operations in state waters of the Great Lakes.  In December 2014, two proposals were submitted to the state agencies to create a net-pen industry in northern Lake Michigan and northern Lake Huron.  After […]

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