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NCCOS a Big Player at 2017 Gulf of Mexico Alliance Meeting

NCCOS scientists and sponsored principal investigators (PIs) joined hundreds of other scientists and managers interested in the ecology and sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico at the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) 2017 All Hands Meeting in Houston, Texas, in late March. With research spanning decades, NCCOS supports a robust research portfolio in the Gulf […]

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NOAA-Funded Workshop Addresses State of Harmful Algal Bloom Sensors

In late January 2017, NCCOS scientists Marc Suddleson and Greg Doucette joined U.S. and international colleagues at an Alliance for Coastal Technologies workshop funded by NOAA Integrated Ocean Observing System to evaluate the state of harmful algal bloom (HAB) sensor technologies. Attendees focused on ways to expedite sensor transition to commercialization and the potential for integrating […]

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Southeast Alaska Tribes Trained in Minimizing Risk of Shellfish Toxins

NCCOS scientists instructed environmental personnel from the southeast Alaska tribes in toxic phytoplankton sampling and identification techniques during the Fourth Workshop of the Southeast Alaska Tribal Toxins (SEATT) Partnership in Sitka, Alaska. The NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network developed these techniques. Also at the workshop, NCCOS scientists provided technical and program development guidance to the Sitka Tribe […]

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NCCOS Supported HAB Sensors Highlighted at NOAA Emerging Technologies Workshop

NCCOS efforts to provide early warnings as well as effective monitoring and forecasting of harmful algal blooms  through the use of the Imaging Flow Cytobot (microscope-in-a-can) and the Environmental Sample Processor (lab-in-a-can) were highlighted at a recent NOAA Emerging Technologies for Observations Workshop convened by the NOAA Observing Systems Council. Two presentations in particular detailed how NCCOS […]

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NCCOS, Partners Prepare Harmful Algal Bloom Sensor for First-ever Deployment in Lake Erie

NCCOS scientists and their partners have completed technical preparations for the first deployment of an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) in the Great Lakes. The ESP—already in use on the U.S. East and West Coasts—is an autonomous, underwater robot that can detect harmful algal bloom cells and toxins in water samples that it collects and analyzes. […]

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NOAA Student Scholars Present Summer Research With NCCOS

Ten student undergraduate scholars, most with the NOAA Educational Partnership Program and Hollings Scholarship Program, are interning this summer with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Silver Spring, MD, Oxford, MD, Beaufort, NC, and Charleston, SC. Their internship programs culminated with presentations by each scholar of their summer research at the Science and […]

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Seaweed “Super Sucker” – Helping Restore Hawaii’s Kaneohe Bay

From 1998 to 2014, NCCOS supported the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative (HCRI) to fund research on Hawaii’s coral reefs, including invasive algae and seaweed control measures. One outcome was the “Super Sucker” in partnership with State of Hawaii and the Nature Conservancy (TNC) to remove invasive algae from Hawaii coral reefs and lagoons; the Super Sucker was eventually […]

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Volunteers Train to Monitor Florida Red Tide in Real Time

Citizen volunteers and college students are evaluating an NCCOS-funded portable sensor that easily and accurately calculates the number of Karenia brevis cells in a water sample, the algae that causes red tides in Florida. This month, St. Petersburg College biotechnology students learned how to use the sensor in a training class at the University of […]

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