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Offshore Sewage Release in Southern California Brings Unexpected Result

A scheduled sewage release off Los Angeles provided a unique opportunity to study before and after impacts of massive nutrient injection into coastal waters. Researchers hypothesized large, potentially harmful algal blooms (HABs), would result from the discharge. The sewage release was extensively studied by NCCOS scientists, sponsored researchers, and partner agencies, and the results were not […]

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2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting Showcases NCCOS Research

The 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting this past winter featured the research of NCCOS scientists and sponsored principal investigators. Topics included ocean acidification, hypoxia, blue carbon, and harmful algal blooms. NCCOS scientists and sponsored researchers gave 24 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired six special sessions. The biennial Ocean Sciences Meeting consists of a diverse program covering […]

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Robotic Environmental Sample Processor Conserves Samples for HAB Species Identification

Sponsored researchers with the NCCOS ECOHAB project looking at regional harmful algal bloom “hotspots” off coastal California are testing the feasibility of using a robotic water quality and toxin detection device, the Environmental Sample Processor or ESP, to collect the glass cells (silicon frustules) of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia for species identification and assessing geographic distribution. Certain species […]

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California Ocean Protection Council Briefed on Harmful Algal Bloom Impacts

At a recent meeting of the California Ocean Protection Council (OPC), a panel of researchers and managers briefed the council on the Summer 2015 West Coast harmful algal bloom (HAB) event and other troubling changing ocean conditions. The presentation highlighted the value of past and current NCCOS competitive HAB programs. These program investments in modeling, monitoring, observing and […]

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Research Gaps Identified to Improve Future Harmful Algal Bloom Forecasts

After a 2013 workshop at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories, NCCOS-sponsored researchers published a study in Harmful Algae addressing the current knowledge of climate change and how it could impact environmental conditions that favor harmful algal bloom (HAB) formation. The workshop gathered a diverse group of HAB researchers who summarized the state of knowledge and information gaps of the potential […]

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NCCOS Research Transitions GrouperChek to Commercialization

Is this really grouper that I am eating? In order to answer this question, NCCOS sponsored scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) developed and patented a quick identification device for commercially important grouper species. A technological offshoot from a portable red tide detection sensor, the apparatus checks for mislabeled “grouper” fish sold at restaurants […]

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U.S. Harmful Algae Symposium Highlights Latest NCCOS Research

NCCOS co-sponsored the Eighth Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States, held this past November in Long Beach, California. The biennial event provides a forum for scientific exchange and technical communication on all aspects of harmful algal bloom (HAB) research in the U.S. NCCOS scientists, managers, and sponsored researchers led sessions on: bloom prediction, forecasting, […]

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Study Supports EPA to Control Both Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Freshwaters

One of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria (blue green algae) in freshwater ecosystems is Microcystis, which produces the liver toxin microcystin. Like many cyanobacteria, blooms of Microcystis are associated with higher temperatures and the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Many freshwater ecosystems are P-limited, meaning P plays the key role in the occurrence of most cyanobacteria blooms, […]

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