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Four New Algal Species Discovered in Hawai‘i’s Mesophotic Waters

NOAA-funded scientists at the University of Hawai‘i have discovered and described four new algal species in Hawai‘i’s mesophotic coral ecosystems. The new species are commonly known as green sea lettuces (Ulva ohiohilulu, Ulva iliohaha, Umbraulva kuaweuweu, and Umbraulva kaloakulau). Sea lettuces are not well described in mesophotic environments (100–500 feet deep), but are known from shallow […]

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NOS and NCCOS Leadership Experience Beaufort Lab Science

Last month, the NOAA Beaufort Lab received two high level visitors: David Holst, the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator of NOS, and Mary Erickson, the Director of NCCOS. The NOAA campus in Beaufort, North Carolina houses researchers from the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOS’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and […]

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New Coral Area Discovered in 2014 in the Gulf of Mexico is Two Times Larger than Previously Thought

Preliminary results from the fourth and final Coral Ecosystem Connectivity expedition (22 August – 4 September 2015) to Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) show the new coral area discovered in 2014 is two times larger than previously thought. Pulley Ridge, the deepest photosynthetic reef off the continental U.S., is one of the […]

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Assessing Contamination in Faga’alu Bay, American Samoa

NCCOS, in collaboration with NOAA Coral Program partners, released a report assessing the pollution in Faga’alu Bay, American Samoa (a US Coral Reef Task Force priority watershed). Faga’alu is a focus area for significant interagency scientific assessment and management activities; NOAA’s field efforts were conducted simultaneously with USGS work in the watershed.  Surface sediment samples were […]

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Coral Reef Monitoring Continues Field Season in the U.S. Virgin Islands

NCCOS scientists, along with other federal and local partners, are diving on reefs surrounding St. Thomas and St. John from July 13-23, collecting data as part of the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP). Earlier this summer, the team conducted similar dives off St. Croix. NCRMP provides a broader geographic context to supplement studies of […]

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Persistent Organic Pollutants Unlikely Cause of Dolphin Health Issues after Deepwater Horizon

NCCOS scientists reported that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were likely not a contributing factor to the poor health conditions and increased mortality observed in some populations of bottlenose dolphins following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill.  This study, recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, analyzed 169 remote biopsy samples that were […]

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Regional Water Management Practices Reduce Biscayne Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

In subtropical Biscayne Bay, Florida, NCCOS research reveals decades of water management practices reduce freshwater flow, negatively impacting abundance and composition of the bay’s nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) communities, fish, and crustaceans. Over the last 50 years, a massive water management system modified the hydrology of the South Florida watershed by altering the quantity, […]

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Reef Fish Movements Tracked in USVI Monument to Assess Boundary Effectiveness

NCCOS and National Park Service (NPS) researchers are evaluating the boundaries of the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument in Coral Bay, St. John relative to the home range of reef fish that the monument was conceived, in part, to protect. The team has tracked reef fish movements using surgically implanted acoustic transmitters and an […]

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