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Can Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems Serve as Lifeboats for Shallow Reefs?

On May 24, 2016, the United Nations Environment Programme released a new report on mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) during a coral reef media roundtable at the second session of the United Nations Environmental Assembly (UNEA-2) in Nairobi, Kenya. The document, Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems: A lifeboat for coral reefs?, edited by GRID-Arendal and NOAA, represents contributions […]

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NOS Science Seminar Highlights NCCOS Social Science on May 5th

This week’s National Ocean Service Science Seminar features “An Overview of Social Science Research within the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science” on Thursday, May 5 from 12-1 pm ET. In recent years, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) has actively grown its social science capacity in order to execute research that has […]

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New Areas and Species of Cordell Bank and Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuaries Characterized in Report

In a hallmark collaboration between scientists from National Marine Sanctuaries, NCCOS, USGS, and California Academy of Sciences, the characterization of seafloor habitats in newly expanded areas of two West Coast sanctuaries is now available online. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys were conducted in September 2014 in the Cordell Banks National Marine Sanctuary (CBNMS) and the Greater […]

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Risk of Shellfish Toxicity Predicted by Temperature and Salinity

A new study shows that water temperature and salinity can indicate the likely occurrence of toxic Alexandrium blooms (a type of harmful algae) in the U. S. Pacific Northwest. As shellfish become contaminated with the toxins produced by these harmful algal blooms (HABs), researchers and shellfish managers can use these findings to predict shellfish toxicity, which causes illness or even […]

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NCCOS-led Collaborative Mapping Supports Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan and Sanctuary Science Needs

This month NCCOS scientists completed two collaborative mapping investigations undertaken to improve Washington State’s marine spatial plan and natural resource management of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. The investigations are intended to reduce conflicts among ocean users; encourage offshore renewable energy development; facilitate compatible uses; and preserve critical ecosystem services to meet economic, environmental, security, and […]

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Regional Consortium Expands Acoustics in Ecosystem Science

The Southeast Acoustics Consortium (SEAC) held its third biennial forum at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission office in St. Petersburg, Florida on March 22-24.  Over fifty participants heard presentations on research applications using high-frequency sonars for surveying marine organisms, mapping seafloor habitats, enhancing ocean observatories, and using ambient noise to study natural soundscapes […]

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Interagency Workshop Improves SE Atlantic Habitat Mapping Coordination

Increased use of our coastal ocean for energy, commerce, and recreation is calling for improved data to support ocean planning and ecosystem management.  The baseline condition and characterization of seafloor habitats is an important base layer needed for minimizing impacts to natural resources.  During the March 15-16 workshop hosted by NCCOS, Southeast and Caribbean Regional […]

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NCCOS Projects at the Forefront of Numerical Estuarine Modeling

Scientists’ use of simulation models has increased during the past several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations into estuarine dynamics. A recently published scientific review paper, authored by NCCOS-sponsored scientists, outlines the progress and accomplishments of coupled hydrodynamic-ecological estuarine modeling. Many NCCOS-sponsored foundational modeling studies are featured in the review paper. Findings show that while most […]

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