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NCCOS Leads Key Topics at International Coral Reef Symposium

This week, staff from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) led special sessions and gave individual presentations at the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The symposium is one of the largest international gatherings that bring together researchers, managers, policy makers, non-governmental organizations, and the general public to share and discuss recent […]

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New Areas and Species of Cordell Bank and Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuaries Characterized in Report

In a hallmark collaboration between scientists from National Marine Sanctuaries, NCCOS, USGS, and California Academy of Sciences, the characterization of seafloor habitats in newly expanded areas of two West Coast sanctuaries is now available online. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys were conducted in September 2014 in the Cordell Banks National Marine Sanctuary (CBNMS) and the Greater […]

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NCCOS-led Collaborative Mapping Supports Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan and Sanctuary Science Needs

This month NCCOS scientists completed two collaborative mapping investigations undertaken to improve Washington State’s marine spatial plan and natural resource management of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. The investigations are intended to reduce conflicts among ocean users; encourage offshore renewable energy development; facilitate compatible uses; and preserve critical ecosystem services to meet economic, environmental, security, and […]

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New Coral Area Discovered in 2014 in the Gulf of Mexico is Two Times Larger than Previously Thought

Preliminary results from the fourth and final Coral Ecosystem Connectivity expedition (22 August – 4 September 2015) to Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) show the new coral area discovered in 2014 is two times larger than previously thought. Pulley Ridge, the deepest photosynthetic reef off the continental U.S., is one of the […]

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Why Nutrient-Enriched Waters Favor Large Single-Cell Algae

Ecological studies show that bottom-up (e.g., nutrient input) and top-down (e.g., grazing/predation) pressures may change the structure of aquatic ecosystems with “cascading” effects throughout the food chain. Recent research supports that zooplankton grazing in high-nutrient waters promotes the growth of larger phytoplankton over smaller species, creating a higher abundance of these larger single celled algae within the food web. Using samples […]

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NCCOS Helps Prioritize Future Mapping Efforts in Southern California Bight

Staff from NCCOS and the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary have developed an inventory of existing spatial data sets depicting seafloor and habitats off the Southern California Bight to set priorities for future mapping efforts in the region. Last month, the team presented the information at a meeting of state, federal, and academic experts working toward consensus about where […]

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NCCOS Data and Expertise Inform Washington’s Marine Spatial Plan

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science have developed species distribution maps and a seafloor mapping inventory to help guide marine spatial planning in the state of Washington. Marine spatial planning is a process that brings together multiple users of the ocean—including energy, industry, government, conservation, and recreation—to make informed and coordinated decisions about marine […]

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NOAA Embarks on Final Expedition to Investigate Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in Gulf of Mexico

Last week, a NOAA-funded investigation of the relatively healthy deep reefs of Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) began its fourth and final expedition. During the two-week mission, the team will launch a remotely operated vehicle from the University of Miami’s R/V F.G. Walton Smith to photograph benthic and fish communities and collect fish […]

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