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Predicting Red Tides in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

NCCOS sponsored researchers with the University of South Florida and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission identified why red tide blooms of toxic Karenia brevis off the west coast of Florida are worse in some years than others, and predict there will be no major red tide outbreaks along Florida’s west coast in 2016. […]

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Outlook for Impact of HABs on 2016 Crab Season in California

On August 11, 2016  Dr. Raphael Kudela, with the University of California Santa Cruz, testified on “Harmful Algal Blooms and Domoic Acid: Latest Forecast and a Look Ahead to the Upcoming Season” to the Joint Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture of the California Legislature. Kudela discussed the massive west coast-wide 2015 toxic Pseudo-nitzchia bloom, drawing a strong link between […]

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NCCOS Supported HAB Sensors Highlighted at NOAA Emerging Technologies Workshop

NCCOS efforts to provide early warnings as well as effective monitoring and forecasting of harmful algal blooms  through the use of the Imaging Flow Cytobot (microscope-in-a-can) and the Environmental Sample Processor (lab-in-a-can) were highlighted at a recent NOAA Emerging Technologies for Observations Workshop convened by the NOAA Observing Systems Council. Two presentations in particular detailed how NCCOS […]

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For Marshes Impacted by Drought and Hurricanes, Salty is Better

A new NCCOS sponsored study published in Geophysical Research Letters found saltwater wetlands generally more resilient than freshwater wetlands. Using remote sensing to determine how saltwater flooding and high winds from hurricanes and periods of extreme drought can stress and alter marshes in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, the study found systems recover more quickly from drought […]

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NOAA Explores Habitats Around WWII Wrecks

Seventy-four years ago, America was in the midst of World War II. On July 15, 1942, German submarine U-576 sank the freighter SS Bluefields, just before the merchant ship convoy and its U.S. military escorts returned fire and sank the U-boat minutes later off of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Both the Bluefields and U-576 remained […]

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New Funding to Protect Chesapeake Bay Oyster Aquaculture from Harmful Algal Blooms

Last week, NCCOS approved funding for the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and a Virginia commercial oyster grower to examine the impacts of harmful algal blooms on oyster aquaculture during active blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate algae Cochlodinium polykrikoides and Alexandrium monilatum. In late July 2016, a bloom of the two harmful algal species expanded, intensified, and […]

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NCCOS, Partners Prepare Harmful Algal Bloom Sensor for First-ever Deployment in Lake Erie

NCCOS scientists and their partners have completed technical preparations for the first deployment of an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) in the Great Lakes. The ESP—already in use on the U.S. East and West Coasts—is an autonomous, underwater robot that can detect harmful algal bloom cells and toxins in water samples that it collects and analyzes. […]

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NOAA Student Scholars Present Summer Research With NCCOS

Ten student undergraduate scholars, most with the NOAA Educational Partnership Program and Hollings Scholarship Program, are interning this summer with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Silver Spring, MD, Oxford, MD, Beaufort, NC, and Charleston, SC. Their internship programs culminated with presentations by each scholar of their summer research at the Science and […]

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