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Studying the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Hawai’i Habitats

An NCCOS-funded Ecological Effects of Sea level Rise (EESLR) project led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) on the Big Island of Hawai‘i is working to understand and predict the effect of sea-level rise on unique and historic Hawaiian groundwater-fed  pools, wetlands, and fishponds. On September 7, scientists joined local stakeholders at a Change Tool Development Workshop and […]

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Seaweed “Super Sucker”¯ Helping Restore Hawaii’s Kaneohe Bay

From 1998 to 2014, NCCOS supported the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative (HCRI) to fund research on Hawaii’s coral reefs, including invasive algae and seaweed control measures. One outcome was the “Super Sucker”¯ in partnership with State of Hawaii and the Nature Conservancy (TNC) to remove invasive algae from Hawaii coral reefs and lagoons; the Super Sucker was […]

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Meeting Challenges in Estuarine and Coastal Ecosystem Science

Along with individual stressor-based research projects, NCCOS undertakes a broader ecosystem approach using larger, multidisciplinary research projects. A recent essay authored in part by NCCOS sponsored scientists gives perspectives on challenges and paths for advancing estuarine science; NCCOS research strives to meet these challenges. Five major research challenges were identified: (1) Maintaining and improving spatially distributed time-series datasets; […]

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Invasive Reed Prefers Altered Shorelines

An NCCOS-funded study found that the invasive non-native variety of the common reed Phragmites australis in the Chesapeake Bay estuary thrives around altered and hardened shorelines and disturbed marshes and beaches with elevated nutrients. The research team also concluded that native Spartina marsh plant communities will struggle under this invasion without management action. The seven-year project […]

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Potential Impacts of Asian Carp in Lake Erie

As the invasive Asian Carp move up the Illinois River threatening the Great Lakes, managers and policy makers struggle with the question of what impact the invasive fish will have on those ecosystems. To understand the potential effects, a team of academic and agency researchers supported by National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science predicted how Lake Erie’s food web could […]

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National Coastal Ocean and Estuary Conference Provides Platform for NCCOS Research

The 23rd biennial Coasatal and Estuarine Research Federation Conference (CERF), held in Portland, Oregon this November, highlighted the scope of research sponsored by NCCOS including harmful algae and their toxins and ocean acidification and hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) interactions. NCCOS exclusively hosted a major session and co-hosted a second major session with the NOAA Office of Oceanic […]

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NCCOS Delivers Hard Truths on Hardened Shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic

NCCOS-sponsored researchers have found that hardened shorelines have negative effects on fish; invertebrates, such as oysters and crabs; and submerged aquatic vegetation. Shoreline hardening is an attempt to stabilize coastal land and protect residential and commercial infrastructure along the coast by building structures, like seawalls, to hold back the sea and prevent the loss of sediment. […]

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NCCOS Hollings Scholar Wins Best Presentation Award

Emily Wallingford, a rising senior at the University of Hawaii at Hilo and a 2015 Hollings Scholar at NOAA’s Beaufort Laboratory, won the best oral presentation award at the 2015 Hollings Symposium on July 27–30. Wallingford’s presentation, “Development of lionfish aggregating devices (LADs) for use as a large-scale control technique,” reported on her research of […]

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