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Annual Lecture Informs Long Island Citizens of Water Quality Threats

Over the last century, Long Island coastal bays, once home to some of the nation’s most productive shellfisheries, have faced a series of environmental threats. The primary culprit appears to be excess nitrogen entering the waters—from fertilizer runoff to septic system effluent—that fuels excessive algal growth, reducing water quality and degrading bay ecosystems. These algal […]

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Long Island Shellfish Industry Briefed on Climate Impacts

On March 2, 2016, approximately 20 people involved in the shellfish industry on Long Island, NY met with Dr. Chris Gobler at his Stony Brook University laboratory to learn about some of the threats climate change could pose to shellfish hatchery and grow-out operations. Participants included county shellfish managers, town hatchery operators, private shellfish companies, […]

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Gulf of Mexico Phytoplankton Communities Altered after Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

On April 20, 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil drilling platform released millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, making it the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history with documented negative impacts to zooplankton, fish, birds, sea turtles, and marine mammals. Now, new research partially funded by NCCOS has disclosed negative impacts […]

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Scientist and Television Station Report Long Island Water Quality Index Weekly

An NCCOS-sponsored scientist partnered with a Long Island television station to create a public water quality index that keeps citizens informed of local water conditions. The online, interactive index provides weekly reports on six water quality parameters—dissolved oxygen, water clarity, temperature, chlorophyll, fecal bacteria, and harmful algal blooms (HABs)—in more than 25 water bodies in and […]

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NCCOS Welcomes New Sea Grant Fellow

NCCOS is pleased to welcome and host Knauss Marine Policy Fellow Dr. Trevor Meckley in 2016. Trevor has a PhD in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University and is sponsored by Michigan Sea Grant. The prestigious Knauss Fellowship, named after one of Sea Grant’s founders and former NOAA Administrator John A. Knauss, matches highly […]

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Coastal Development Impacts Puerto Rico’s Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems

NCCOS-supported research recently published in Coral Reefs suggests coastal development negatively impacts mesophotic coral ecosystems, which were previously considered less likely to be affected by anthropogenic activities due to their greater depths. The project assessed the vulnerability of light-dependent mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) off the south coast of Puerto Rico to anthropogenic impacts. Results showed that MCEs located […]

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Hardened Shorelines Associated with Seagrass Decline in Southern Chesapeake Bay

A recent study sponsored by NCCOS found that submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the saltier (and more southern) portions of Chesapeake Bay decreases in areas near hardened shorelines. Shoreline hardening is an attempt to stabilize coastal land and protect residential and commercial infrastructure along the coast by building structures, like bulkheads, to hold back the sea and prevent the […]

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Study Supports EPA to Control Both Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Freshwaters

One of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria (blue green algae) in freshwater ecosystems is Microcystis, which produces the liver toxin microcystin. Like many cyanobacteria, blooms of Microcystis are associated with higher temperatures and the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Many freshwater ecosystems are P-limited, meaning P plays the key role in the occurrence of most cyanobacteria blooms, […]

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