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Shellfish Larvae Struggle in Fluctuating Oxygen and Acidity in Estuaries

A study supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program found that interacting effects of acidified and low oxygen (hypoxic) waters reduced the survival, growth, and development of larval stages of three important shellfish species: bay scallops, hard clams and eastern oysters. Shellfish larvae were exposed to ideal, acidified and low oxygen conditions both individually and in […]

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NOAA Awards $10.44 million for Coastal Science: Sea Level Rise, Hypoxia and Harmful Algal Blooms

October 25, 2016 - NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science will award $10.44 million over the next five years for 10 projects to address sea level rise, hypoxia and harmful algal blooms (HABs). Among the projects the 10 awards will support are: coastal lowland habitat research in California; understanding and mitigating sea level rise and […]

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Establishing Sustainable and Cooperative Dead Zone Monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico

Scientists, managers, and agency personnel from 26 stakeholder agencies and institutions met to establish a sustainable multi-partner hypoxia monitoring program in the northern Gulf of Mexico at the NCCOS sponsored 6th Annual NOAA/Northern Gulf Institute Hypoxia Research Coordination Workshop. The 2012 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring Implementation Plan and subsequent workshops provided a foundation to move […]

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NOAA Student Scholars Present Summer Research With NCCOS

Ten student undergraduate scholars, most with the NOAA Educational Partnership Program and Hollings Scholarship Program, are interning this summer with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) in Silver Spring, MD, Oxford, MD, Beaufort, NC, and Charleston, SC. Their internship programs culminated with presentations by each scholar of their summer research at the Science and […]

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Seaweed “Super Sucker” – Helping Restore Hawaii’s Kaneohe Bay

From 1998 to 2014, NCCOS supported the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative (HCRI) to fund research on Hawaii’s coral reefs, including invasive algae and seaweed control measures. One outcome was the “Super Sucker” in partnership with State of Hawaii and the Nature Conservancy (TNC) to remove invasive algae from Hawaii coral reefs and lagoons; the Super Sucker was eventually […]

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Meeting Challenges in Estuarine and Coastal Ecosystem Science

Along with individual stressor-based research projects, NCCOS undertakes a broader ecosystem approach using larger, multidisciplinary research projects. A recent essay authored in part by NCCOS sponsored scientists gives perspectives on challenges and paths for advancing estuarine science; NCCOS research strives to meet these challenges. Five major research challenges were identified: (1) Maintaining and improving spatially distributed time-series datasets; […]

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NCCOS Science Leads to International Coral Conservation Effort

A group of prominent marine environmental experts recently committed to working with government leaders of Palau, Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands on coral conservation. The group pledged to provide their expertise in natural and social science, engineering, economics, and law to provide scientific and technical assistance to managers and policy makers. This will, in turn, build […]

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Invasive Reed Prefers Altered Shorelines

An NCCOS-funded study found that the invasive non-native variety of the common reed Phragmites australis in the Chesapeake Bay estuary thrives around altered and hardened shorelines and disturbed marshes and beaches with elevated nutrients. The research team also concluded that native Spartina marsh plant communities will struggle under this invasion without management action. The seven-year project […]

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