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Price of Shrimp Impacted by Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone”

The low oxygen conditions slow shrimp growth, leading to fewer and more expensive large shrimp A NOAA-funded study led by Duke University has found that the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” drives up the price of large shrimp relative to small shrimp, creating an economic impact that directly affects consumers, fishermen and seafood markets. The […]

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Nutrient Crediting of Oyster Aquaculture in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS scientist, Suzanne Bricker, spoke at the 2017 East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo seminar program on January 14, 2017. Collaborating with Maryland Sea Grant, the presentation ‘Oyster Best Management Practices: What does it mean for growers?’ highlighted the recently approved recommendations for crediting oyster tissue for nutrient removal as a Best Management Practice (BMP), […]

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2016 Chesapeake Bay Hypoxia Forecast is Close to Mark

As predicted by an earlier forecast sponsored by NCCOS, dissolved oxygen conditions in Maryland’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay main channel continued to be average for most of the summer of 2016. In mid-June, NCCOS issued the annual hypoxic zone forecasts for the Chesapeake Bay, predicting a close to average sized hypoxic volume for the bay […]

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NCCOS Research Highlighted at Interagency Oil Pollution Meeting

NCCOS scientists presented their research on oil spill mitigation products at the first quarter meeting of the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research (ICCOPR), which was also attended by several congressional staffers. The research compared the toxicity of a variety of oil spill dispersants and shoreline cleaner products on a range of estuarine organisms, […]

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Panel Releases First Recommendations on Oyster Aquaculture Practices that Reduce Nutrients in Chesapeake Bay

This week the Chesapeake Bay Program and its partners approved the Oyster Best Management Practices Expert Panel’s first recommendations on specific oyster aquaculture practices that remove excess nitrogen and phosphorus from Chesapeake Bay. The recommendations are intended to become best management practices in support of the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, pollution limits established by the U.S. […]

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Discarded Aluminum Foil Contributes to Recent Bottlenose Dolphin Death

A necropsy of a female bottlenose dolphin stranded in emaciated condition last month on Edisto Beach, South Carolina, revealed a large piece of aluminum foil lodged in the marine mammal’s esophagus. The NCCOS scientists conducting the examination reported that the foil caused a complete blockage of the esophagus, resulting in the dolphin’s inability to swallow and […]

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Shellfish Larvae Struggle in Fluctuating Oxygen and Acidity in Estuaries

A study supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program found that interacting effects of acidified and low oxygen (hypoxic) waters reduced the survival, growth, and development of larval stages of three important shellfish species: bay scallops, hard clams and eastern oysters. Shellfish larvae were exposed to ideal, acidified and low oxygen conditions both individually and in […]

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NOAA Awards $10.44 million for Coastal Science: Sea Level Rise, Hypoxia and Harmful Algal Blooms

October 25, 2016 - NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science will award $10.44 million over the next five years for 10 projects to address sea level rise, hypoxia and harmful algal blooms (HABs). Among the projects the 10 awards will support are: coastal lowland habitat research in California; understanding and mitigating sea level rise and […]

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