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Mesophotic Reefs in Southwest Puerto Rico Shaped by Sediment Movement

Sediment exerts a basic control on the character and distribution of both shallow and mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs). In a rare study focused on sediment dynamics of MCEs, NCCOS-supported scientists found that downslope bed-load transport from shallower reefs (by coral and calcareous algae) exceeds suspended-sediment accumulation and has important influence in shaping MCEs in southwest […]

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NCCOS a Big Player at 2017 Gulf of Mexico Alliance Meeting

NCCOS scientists and sponsored principal investigators (PIs) joined hundreds of other scientists and managers interested in the ecology and sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico at the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) 2017 All Hands Meeting in Houston, Texas, in late March. With research spanning decades, NCCOS supports a robust research portfolio in the Gulf […]

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NCCOS Research on Display at 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting

From February 26 to March 3, 2017 the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) held its biennial Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, Hawai′i. NCCOS scientists and sponsored investigators shared their research results with thousands of limnologists and oceanographers from around the world. Topics included harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, science to management applications, […]

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More Complete Dolphin Genome Could Improve Assessments

A new, more exhaustive Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) genome, or complete set of the species’ genetic material, was completed by NOAA partners at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Genetic data from T. truncatus blood and skin studies were made available by NOAA’s NCCOS […]

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Hardened Shorelines Decrease Small Fish and Invertebrate Abundance

New NCCOS-sponsored research shows that shoreline hardening has mostly negative effects on estuarine animals. This is evident both at a local scale directly next to a hardened shoreline and at the larger system-wide scale as the percent of shoreline hardening accumulated in an estuarine area. Scientists examined 15 common fish and invertebrate species in tributaries of […]

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Hypoxia Effects on Fish and Fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico

Dr. Kim de Mutsert, lead Principal Investigator (PI) for the newly awarded Northern Gulf of Mexico project “User-driven tools to predict and assess effects of reduced nutrients an hypoxia on living resources in the Gulf of Mexico,” led a workshop entitled “Hypoxia effects on fish and fisheries” at the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and […]

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Price of Shrimp Impacted by Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone”

The low oxygen conditions slow shrimp growth, leading to fewer and more expensive large shrimp A NOAA-funded study led by Duke University has found that the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” drives up the price of large shrimp relative to small shrimp, creating an economic impact that directly affects consumers, fishermen and seafood markets. The […]

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Nutrient Crediting of Oyster Aquaculture in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS scientist, Suzanne Bricker, spoke at the 2017 East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo seminar program on January 14, 2017. Collaborating with Maryland Sea Grant, the presentation ‘Oyster Best Management Practices: What does it mean for growers?’ highlighted the recently approved recommendations for crediting oyster tissue for nutrient removal as a Best Management Practice (BMP), […]

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