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Dolphin Entanglements Follow Historic 1,000 Year Rainfall in South Carolina

From October 1 through October 5, 2015 South Carolina experienced a catastrophic rainfall event that produced over 24 inches of rain in some areas from Columbia to Charleston. On October 8 a dolphin was found alive entangled in a crab pot line on the south side of Charleston Harbor where the Ashley River discharges. A […]

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Sea Level Rise Shoreline Model Reconstructs Past to Predict Future

A unique NCCOS sponsored study, recently published in Contenental Shelf Research, examined the influence of sea level rise (SLR) on historic mainland and barrier island beaches and salt marshes of Mississippi’s Grand Bay in Mississippi Sound. The research used historical data to investigate how excess erosion in Grand Bay and SLR will affect any future changes […]

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NCCOS Sponsors 20 New Research Projects

NCCOS awarded nearly $4.5 million in new research grants while maintaining sponsorship of 42 continuing projects during 2015 for a total of $8.2 million in funding for innovative research. All of the endeavors address significant and complex coastal issues. The projects were selected using a rigorous, competitive, and peer-review process. The cutting-edge research will provide critical […]

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Government Regulators Consider Negative Impacts of Shoreline Armoring

Results from a six-year NCCOS sponsored study on the impacts of different approaches to erosion control – seawalls, riprap, and “living” shorelines – on submerged aquatic plants, crabs, fish, ducks, and geese in Chesapeake Bay has prompted government regulators to consider the cumulative impacts of shoreline armoring projects in upcoming management decisions. Scientists have presented […]

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New FY 2016 Funding Opportunity Available to Research Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise

NCCOS has created a funding opportunity for Fiscal Year 2016 for researchers to assess the ability of natural and nature-based coastal features to mitigate the effects of sea level rise and coastal inundation. The geographic scope of this funding is limited to coastal regions of southern California (defined as San Louis Obispo County south to the U.S./Mexico border) and […]

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Hardened Shorelines Make it Hard for Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

A recent NCCOS-funded study found that shoreline hardening, particularly riprap, has a negative effect on the abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Riprap, which is made up of rocks and boulders piled along the shoreline, is commonly used to prevent shoreline erosion, but once installed, alters the natural processes and composition of the land–sea interface. The […]

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Support Grows for Living Shorelines in North Carolina

In recent decades, increased development along our nation’s estuarine shorelines has led to shoreline hardening as landowners attempt to protect their properties from coastal erosion. Estuarine shorelines are a transition zone between open water and upland regions and provide a variety of ecosystem services, including essential habitat to commercially and ecologically important species, buffering storm-driven […]

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Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise Models Improved by Innovative Measurement of Coastal Marsh Elevation

Coastal marsh elevation, a measurement used in models to predict impacts of sea level rise and periodic flooding from storm surge, is commonly determined by remote sensing methods that have been found to overestimate marsh platform height. In order to address this inaccuracy, known as a “saturation problem” caused by dense vegetation, NOAA’s National Centers of […]

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