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For Marshes Impacted by Drought and Hurricanes, Salty is Better

A new NCCOS sponsored study published in Geophysical Research Letters found saltwater wetlands generally more resilient than freshwater wetlands. Using remote sensing to determine how saltwater flooding and high winds from hurricanes and periods of extreme drought can stress and alter marshes in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, the study found systems recover more quickly from drought […]

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Living Shorelines Provide Better Fish Habitats

In many places, estuarine shorelines are protected from erosion by riprap–a jumble of rock and other hard materials piled along the shore. More recently, living shorelines¯ have become the focus of study as an alternative approach that preserves ecological function as well as providing shoreline protection. For example, riprap-sill structures are a type of living shoreline¯ combining a rock […]

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Meeting Challenges in Estuarine and Coastal Ecosystem Science

Along with individual stressor-based research projects, NCCOS undertakes a broader ecosystem approach using larger, multidisciplinary research projects. A recent essay authored in part by NCCOS sponsored scientists gives perspectives on challenges and paths for advancing estuarine science; NCCOS research strives to meet these challenges. Five major research challenges were identified: (1) Maintaining and improving spatially distributed time-series datasets; […]

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NCCOS Science Leads to International Coral Conservation Effort

A group of prominent marine environmental experts recently committed to working with government leaders of Palau, Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands on coral conservation. The group pledged to provide their expertise in natural and social science, engineering, economics, and law to provide scientific and technical assistance to managers and policy makers. This will, in turn, build […]

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Keeping Up With Rising Seas

Scientists predicted wetland soil accretion (or growth) rates in relation to predicted sea level rise using a model and data from numerous tidal salt and freshwater wetlands around the United States. The model results, published in Earth’s Future, suggested that, on average, softer organic components of East Coast marsh sediments do not accrete  fast enough in volume and height […]

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Connecting with Local Communities to Document Sea Level Rise in North Carolina

A NCCOS project to understand and predict changes in North Carolina coastal marshes, and their capacity to protect shorelines from the combined impacts of sea-level rise, tides, and storm surge partnered with the NOAA North Carolina Sentinel Site Cooperative. Project leader, Dr. Christine Voss (University of North Carolina Institute of Marine Sciences), combines research results […]

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NOS and NCCOS Leadership Experience Beaufort Lab Science

Last month, the NOAA Beaufort Lab received two high level visitors: David Holst, the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator of NOS, and Mary Erickson, the Director of NCCOS. The NOAA campus in Beaufort, North Carolina houses researchers from the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOS’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and […]

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Blue Carbon Potential of Living Shorelines

A recent NOAA study shows Living Shorelines are not only an excellent method of erosion control for coastal properties but also sequester carbon which increases coastal resilience. Living shorelines are a green infrastructure technique of incorporating native vegetation alone or in combination with offshore sills to stabilize the shoreline. Continued use of the living shoreline […]

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