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NCCOS Participates in Southeast Living Shorelines Workshop

The Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance held the Southeast Living Shorelines Workshop at the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Charleston on October 12-13, 2016.  In an effort to expand and enhance the appropriate use of alternative shoreline stabilization techniques, the workshop focused on developing a consensus statement with key members of the living shorelines community in […]

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NOAA Awards $3.4 million to Support Coastal Community Resilience

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science are awarding over $1.3 million, with an anticipated total of $3.4 million over the next four years, for research that will provide coastal managers with the science to plan for sea level rise and flooding, and improve the resilience of their communities. With increasing threats to our coasts, enhancing resilience to […]

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Studying the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Hawaii Habitats

An NCCOS-funded Ecological Effects of Sea level Rise (EESLR) project led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) on the Big Island of Hawaii is working to understand and predict the effect of sea-level rise on unique and historic Hawaiian groundwater-fed  pools, wetlands, and fishponds. On September 7, scientists joined local stakeholders at a Change Tool Development Workshop and […]

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For Marshes Impacted by Drought and Hurricanes, Salty is Better

A new NCCOS sponsored study published in Geophysical Research Letters found saltwater wetlands generally more resilient than freshwater wetlands. Using remote sensing to determine how saltwater flooding and high winds from hurricanes and periods of extreme drought can stress and alter marshes in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, the study found systems recover more quickly from drought […]

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Living Shorelines Provide Better Fish Habitats

In many places, estuarine shorelines are protected from erosion by riprap–a jumble of rock and other hard materials piled along the shore. More recently, living shorelines¯ have become the focus of study as an alternative approach that preserves ecological function as well as providing shoreline protection. For example, riprap-sill structures are a type of living shoreline¯ combining a rock […]

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Meeting Challenges in Estuarine and Coastal Ecosystem Science

Along with individual stressor-based research projects, NCCOS undertakes a broader ecosystem approach using larger, multidisciplinary research projects. A recent essay authored in part by NCCOS sponsored scientists gives perspectives on challenges and paths for advancing estuarine science; NCCOS research strives to meet these challenges. Five major research challenges were identified: (1) Maintaining and improving spatially distributed time-series datasets; […]

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NCCOS Science Leads to International Coral Conservation Effort

A group of prominent marine environmental experts recently committed to working with government leaders of Palau, Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands on coral conservation. The group pledged to provide their expertise in natural and social science, engineering, economics, and law to provide scientific and technical assistance to managers and policy makers. This will, in turn, build […]

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Keeping Up With Rising Seas

Scientists predicted wetland soil accretion (or growth) rates in relation to predicted sea level rise using a model and data from numerous tidal salt and freshwater wetlands around the United States. The model results, published in Earth’s Future, suggested that, on average, softer organic components of East Coast marsh sediments do not accrete  fast enough in volume and height […]

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