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Projects

Characterization of Toxin Synthesis Pathways in To...

During the past 25 years, the abundance, range, and variety of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their toxins have been increasing, impacting human and marine animal health through consumption of ...
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Developing Biomarkers for Bloom Growth and Death i...

The microscopic alga Karenia brevis causes harmful algal blooms (red tides) in the Gulf of Mexico. By studying the processes regulating the life cycle of K. brevis, we developed biomarkers ...
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Genomics of HAB Dinoflagellates: Identification of...

We are working to identify key genes and processes encoded in the dinoflagellate genome that are responsible for regulating the growth, maintenance, and termination of toxic dinoflagellate blooms. Analogous to ...
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Validating the Technique for Identifying Paralytic...

Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a world-wide, sometimes fatal seafood poisoning caused by potent algal neurotoxins that accumulate in shellfish. Most nations have certified shellfish PSP testing programs required for ...
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News

NCCOS Hosts Visiting Scientists

Collaborationto Identify Ecologically Important Areas in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary NCCOS Biogeography Branch staff are working with visiting scholar Daniel Mateos-Molina, on methods to identify ecologically important areas ...
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NCCOS Improves Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxin...

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) providedtraining in Charleston, South Carolina, August 26 -28, 2014 on the NCCOS-developed receptor binding assay for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins ...
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NCCOS and Partners Field Test New Tools for Harmfu...

A new harmful algal bloom field test was used on a live bloom for the first time allowing for near-real-time, ship-board characterization of a bloom patch during a research cruise ...
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NCCOS Provides Florida Agency Specialized Training...

Earlier this month, NCCOS researchers provided a visiting scientist from Florida's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Red Tide Monitoring Program training on the use of physiological biomarkers for harmful ...
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Toxins Detection Workshop Promotes International T...

NCCOS scientist Tina Mikulski recently led a workshop in Muscat, Oman, on the detection of paralytic shellfish toxins, which can accumulate in shellfish, causing human illness and death. Shellfish must ...
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NOAA Teams with NIST to Transfer HAB Detection Met...

NOAA's harmful algal bloomAnalytical Response Team has teamed with Hollings Marine Lab partner, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to provide training for a NIST International Fellow on ...
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NCCOS-developed Method for Toxins Detection Approv...

Earlier this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) approved a new assay developed by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)as an official method for identifying toxicity that ...
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NCCOS Transfers Toxin Detection Method to Maine St...

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) provided training on the NCCOS-developed receptor binding assay (RBA) for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins to visiting scientist Darcie Couture, ...
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NCCOS delivers ecosystem science solutions for stewardship of the nation’s ocean and coastal resources, in direct support of NOS priorities, offices, and customers, and to sustain thriving coastal communities and economies.

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
1305 East West Highway, Rm 8110
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (240) 533-0300 / Fax: (301) 713-4353
Email: nccos.webcontent@noaa.gov

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