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Projects

Linking Biogeochemistry to Harmful Algal Bloom Nut...

The Long Island Brown Tide (LIBT) threatens shellfish and sea grasses in mid-Atlantic estuaries. LIBT-specific gene expression assays are being developed and tested for enzymes and transporters that allow LIBT ...

Linking Models and Field Experiments to Forecast A...

We are investigating the links between environmental variables and harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins in Lake Erie to better understand the process of toxin development and to forecast HAB toxicity ...

Mechanism of Harmful Algal Bloom Initiation in the...

Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, threaten human and ecosystem health and local economies around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the blooms mostly prevail on the west coast of ...

Metabolism and Physiology of Red Tide Toxins in Tu...

Endangered sea turtles experience severe mortality during Florida red tides. This project uses non-endangered freshwater turtles as a model animal to determine the effects of Florida red tide on endangered ...

Modeling Favorable Habitat for Alexandrium catenel...

In Puget Sound, the toxic alga Alexandrium catenella threatens people who eat shellfish contaminated with the algal toxin. Previous studies identify “seedbeds” of Alexandrium resting stages (cysts) on the bottom ...

Multidisciplinary Approach to a Cross-Regional Pro...

Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) has emerged as a significant and expanding seafood safety threat in coastal regions across the United States. The harmful algal species Dinophysis produces toxins known to ...

New Tools to Aid in Managing Ciguatera Poisoning R...

Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most frequently reported non-bacterial illness associated with eating fish in the United States and the U. S. territorial islands. Ciguatera significantly impacts commercial and recreational ...

Oceanographic and Cellular Controls on Domoic Acid...

Domoic acid is a neurotoxin produced by some diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Domoic acid can accumulate in shellfish and fish, and cause illness or death in humans, marine mammals, ...

Resolving the Effects of Resource Availability, Pr...

Aureococcus anophagefferens causes brown tides that have severely impacted fisheries, seagrass beds, and aquaculture in mid-Atlantic US coastal waters for three decades. The recent sequencing of the Aureococcus genome, combined ...

The Columbia River Plume and Harmful Algal Blooms ...

We identified the oceanographic causes and transport routes for the harmful alga Pseudo-nitzschia in the offshore waters of the Pacific Northwest and improved predictability of the arrival of harmful algal ...

News

Public Reporting Tool Helps Long Island’s Suffolk ...

Brown tides and other harmful algal blooms (HABs) are becoming a recurrent seasonal issue in the coastal waters of New York’s Suffolk County. A NCCOS brown tide research project provided ...

Urea-based Fertilizer Promotes Blue-Green Algal Bl...

Figure 1. The MERHAB Autonomous Research Vessel In-situ (MARVIN) deployed in Sarasota Bay in 2009. Credit FWC. A recent NCCOS-supported study observed that urea inputs into Sarasota Bay, FL influenced ...

HAB Toxin of Unknown Origin Linked to a Dinoflagel...

Dinophysis norvegica. Credit WHOI. The biological source of Dihydrodinopyhysistoxin-1 (aka dihydro-DTX1), a toxin that causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning and once described from a marine sponge, is of yet unknown. In ...

NCCOS, IOOS Award $11.6 Million for Harmful Algal ...

Harmful Algal Bloom in Western Basin of Lake Erie: September 2017. Photo Credit: Aerial Associates Photography, Inc. by Zachary Haslick NOAA has announced funding for 17 new research projects around ...

NCCOS Research Explores New Approaches to Decoding...

A brown tide bloom in Great South Bay, Long Island, NY .Credit: Dr. Chris Gobler, Stony Brook University. Brown tides, caused by the algal species Aureococcus anophagefferens, have been plaguing ...

NCCOS Research Provides Scientific Foundation for ...

A recent U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) ruling found that pollution discharge into groundwater from a Maui County (HI) sewage treatment plant (County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund) fueled macroalgal ...

Co-occurrence of Different HAB Toxins Detected in ...

NCCOS-sponsored research has documented the presence of three harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins at seven different locations, about 18 to 33 miles apart, off the coast of southern California. All ...

NCCOS “HABs Grab” Takes One-Day Snapshot of Lake E...

HABs Grab 2019 research team. Credit J. Chaffin, Ohio State University. Initiated and funded in part by NCCOS, scientists in the Western Basin of Lake Erie conducted the largest coordinated ...

Products

Maps, Tools & Applications

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Data & Publications

Planktonic microbes in the Gulf of Maine area

In the Gulf of Maine area (GoMA), as elsewhere in the ocean, the organisms of greatest numerical abundance are microbes. Viruses in GoMA are largely cyanophages and bacteriophages, including podoviruses which lack tails. There is also evidence of Mimivirus and ...

Prominent Human Health Impacts from Several Marine Microbes: History, Ecology, and Public Health Implications

This paper overviews several examples of important public health impacts by marine microbes and directs readers to the extensive literature germane to these maladies. These examples include three types of dinoflagellates (Gambierdiscus spp., Karenia brevis, and Alexandrium fundyense), BMAA-producing cyanobacteria, ...

Skill assessment for coupled biological/physical models of marine systems

Simulation models coupling physics to biological processes in the ocean are central to many current programs. Ocean physical models have approached a high level of sophistication; the physical relationships are canonical, and modern computational technology for fluid mechanics has advanced ...

Skill Assessment for Coupled Biological/Physical Models of Marine Systems

Coupled biological/physical models of marine systems serve many purposes including the synthesis of information, hypothesis generation, and as a tool for numerical experimentation. However, marine system models are increasingly used for prediction to support high-stakes decision-making. In such applications it ...

Suppression of the 2010 Alexandrium fundyense bloom by changes in physical, biological, and chemical properties of the Gulf of Maine

For the period 2005–2009, the abundance of resting cysts in bottom sediments from the preceding autumn was a first-order predictor of the overall severity of spring–summer blooms of Alexandrium fundyense in the western Gulf of Maine and southern New England ...

The globally distributed genus Alexandrium: Multifaceted roles in marine ecosystems and impacts on human health

The dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium is one of the major harmful algal bloom (HAB) genera with respect to the diversity, magnitude and consequences of blooms. The ability of Alexandrium to colonize multiple habitats and to persist over large regions through time ...

The influence of anthropogenic nitrogen loading and meteorological conditions on the dynamics and toxicity of Alexandrium fundyense blooms in a New York (USA) estuary

The goal of this two-year study was to explore the role of nutrients and climatic conditions in promoting reoccurring Alexandrium fundyense blooms in the Northport-Huntington Bay complex, NY, USA. A bloom in 2007 was short and small (3 weeks, 103 ...

Zooplankton community grazing impact on a bloom of Alexandrium fundyense in the Gulf of Maine

Shipboard grazing experiments were conducted in the Gulf of Maine and on Georges Bank during of June 2006 to estimate zooplankton community grazing impact on a natural bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. Surface seawater samples containing natural populations ...
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