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Galveston Bay Closed to Oyster Harvesting After Scientists Detect Toxic Algal Bloom

The Texas Department of State Health Services is temporarily closing all of the Galveston Bay system to the harvesting of oysters, clams, and mussels because of elevated levels of an alga that can produce a toxin in some shellfish. NCCOS-funded scientists at Texas A&M University detected the harmful algal bloom and notified the state agency, […]

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Working to Reduce Toxic Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored researchers recently explored several promising techniques to mitigate toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms in the Chesapeake Bay region. The team focused on sediment-flocculation, in which local sediments and commercial clays are combined with the flocculating compound chitosan to sink and bury Microcystis cyanobacteria blooms. Other techniques evaluated included post-bloom flushing and early spring deployment of […]

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NCCOS-developed Method for Toxins Detection Approved for Regulatory Testing of Shellfish in the U.S

Earlier this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) approved a new assay developed by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) as an official method for identifying toxicity that could result in paralytic shellfish poisoning. This approval is the culmination of more than a decade of effort to find an alternative to live animal […]

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Bacteria Isolate Degrades Harmful Algal Toxins in Drinking Water

Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (“cyanoHABs”) occur worldwide—causing detrimental effects to ecosystems and local economies—and can produce toxins that pose threats to human health and limit potable water supplies. Microcystis and other genera of cyanobacteria produce a compound known as Microcystin-LR (MCLR) that is toxic to the liver and inhibits nerve functions, muscle activity, and cellular metabolism. […]

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Using Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality in Long Island Sound and Great Bay Estuaries

On Nov. 18, staff from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Northeast Fisheries Laboratory met with outside partners to continue investigating the potential importance of shellfish aquaculture in removing nutrients and improving water quality in the Long Island Sound and Great Bay/Piscataqua River Estuaries. The results of this EPA Regional Ecosystem Services Program–funded study […]

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NCCOS Calibrates Harmful Algal Bloom Toxin Sensors in California

An NCCOS scientist visited the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Nov. 6–13 to perform critical calibration of NCCOS-developed domoic acid sensors on two robotic Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs). Results of these calibrations and the analysis of controlled test samples will allow researchers to accurately quantify harmful algal bloom toxin data generated during two ESP […]

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NCCOS Coordinates Development of New Korean Project on Harmful Algae

NCCOS staff chaired a two-day meeting in Busan, Republic of Korea (August 29–30, 2013) convened to finalize a new collaborative project on harmful algae. The project, one component of the larger Joint Project Agreement (JPA) between NOAA and the newly formed Korean Ministry of Oceans & Fisheries, will focus on issues related to the monitoring […]

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ESRI Awards NCCOS Researcher with Special Achievement Award for GIS Technology Innovation

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) were honored this year with the Special Achievement in GIS award at the 2013 Esri International User Conference in San Diego. This award acknowledges vision, leadership, hard work and innovative use of Esri’s geographic information system technology. The application, using the ArcGIS Flex API, is a browser-based mapping tool displaying […]

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