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Marsh Hydrology Model Supports Hurricane Sandy Restoration

In support of restoration and resilience of marshes impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) chose an NCCOS-supported forecast model to predict marsh ecology and hydrology related to combined effects from storm surge and sea level rise. The model selected was developed as part of the NCCOS sponsored Ecological Effects of Sea […]

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NCCOS Leads International Effort to Reduce Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

To reduce incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) and increase safety of seafood consumption around the world, scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) are leading international efforts to develop a global strategy to improve Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) monitoring and prediction. The strategy, endorsed by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, was one of […]

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NCCOS Transfers Tools and Techniques to Environmental Cooperative Science Center

Last month, NCCOS scientists led workshops designed to transfer to NOAA’s Environmental Cooperative Science Center (ECSC) protocols and analyses used by NCCOS scientists to assess ecosystem health. The workshops focused on using indicators of organismal well-being to estimate population-level health, habitat quality, and ecosystem change in response to environmental factors. Approximately 30 ECSC graduate students […]

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Phytoplankton Monitoring Network Volunteers in Georgia Trained in Marine Debris Reporting

The NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) program recently trained volunteers from Georgia in harmful algal bloom and marine debris monitoring. Volunteers from Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary, Burton 4-H, and the University of Georgia’s Marine Extension Service received instruction on target phytoplankton species for change detection, as well as how to identify microplastics in phytoplankton […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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New Molecular Tool Screens Bait Fish for Invasive Species Risk

Sixty-nine of 180 aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the Great Lakes region are fish, many of which pose threats to native species and ecosystem functioning. One potential pathway for AIS introductions is the commercial bait trade; anglers commonly release unused bait fish back into lakes and streams, despite current regulations and management in the Great Lakes region. Previous […]

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Gulf of Mexico Alliance Produces Guide for Monitoring Harmful Algal Toxins

To improve the efficacy and consistency of toxin assessments and response, the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) produced a guide for Gulf state managers on harmful algal bloom toxin monitoring protocols. GOMA collaborated with federal, state, academic, and NGO partners to advance Gulf ecosystem management through a coordinated, consensus-based approach. The National Centers for Coastal […]

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NCCOS Improves Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxin Testing for FDA

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) provided training in Charleston, South Carolina, August 26-28, 2014 on the NCCOS-developed receptor binding assay for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins to visiting scientists from the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Northeast Regional Laboratory, which plans to implement the assay for regulatory testing of shellfish imports. Paralytic shellfish […]

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