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Toxins Detection Workshop Promotes International Trade of Shellfish

NCCOS scientist Tina Mikulski recently led a workshop in Muscat, Oman, on the detection of paralytic shellfish toxins—which can accumulate in shellfish, causing human illness and death. Shellfish must be screened for these toxins (produced by harmful algae in the genus Alexandrium) prior to sale and consumption. The workshop was designed through a formal agreement between […]

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High-tech Armada Links Toxic Algal Blooms and Nutrients from Sewage off Southern California

Last month, NCCOS-funded scientists deployed two Environmental Sample Processors, two research vessels, five autonomous underwater vehicles, and five drifters in the ocean around San Pedro Bay, off Southern California, seeking signs of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Not long after deployment, this high-tech armada detected a large phytoplankton bloom that included the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and its […]

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NOAA Teams with NIST to Transfer HAB Detection Methods to Portugal’s Marine Animal Rehabilitation Centre

NOAA’s harmful algal bloom Analytical Response Team has teamed with Hollings Marine Lab partner, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to provide training for a NIST International Fellow on algal toxin detection in marine wildlife. Dr. Rute Costa of the Marine Animal Rehabilitation Centre in Figueira da Foz, Portugal, is nearing completion of this […]

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Glider Implementation Plan Provides Blueprint for Improved Monitoring of Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone

The Glider Implementation Plan for Hypoxia Monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico is now available to guide the use of autonomous underwater vehicles for enhanced monitoring of seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The need for improved monitoring of the hypoxic zone (dead zone) has been repeatedly emphasized by the Interagency Gulf Hypoxia Task […]

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Gulf of Maine Red Tide Forecast Suggests Modest Bloom: Robotic Sensors Deployed to Confirm and Improve Future Predictions

A team of NOAA and academic researchers led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has issued a seasonal red tide forecast for the Gulf of Maine as part of a pilot program that expands NOAA harmful algal bloom (HAB) forecasting to this region. The forecast suggests a modest bloom for the upcoming 2014 season. […]

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Underwater Robots Detect Toxic Algae off Southern California

Two autonomous underwater robots deployed in San Pedro Bay off southern California have detected the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and its potent neurotoxin domoic acid. This may signal the initiation of a harmful algal bloom along the coast that could impact a variety of wildlife and fishery resources. The robots, known as Environmental Sample Processors, are essentially underwater, molecular […]

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Galveston Bay Closed to Oyster Harvesting After Scientists Detect Toxic Algal Bloom

The Texas Department of State Health Services is temporarily closing all of the Galveston Bay system to the harvesting of oysters, clams, and mussels because of elevated levels of an alga that can produce a toxin in some shellfish. NCCOS-funded scientists at Texas A&M University detected the harmful algal bloom and notified the state agency, […]

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Working to Reduce Toxic Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored researchers recently explored several promising techniques to mitigate toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms in the Chesapeake Bay region. The team focused on sediment-flocculation, in which local sediments and commercial clays are combined with the flocculating compound chitosan to sink and bury Microcystis cyanobacteria blooms. Other techniques evaluated included post-bloom flushing and early spring deployment of […]

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