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The Craib Corer: Predicting Harmful Algal Blooms by Sampling the Seafloor

Forecasting harmful algal blooms is a complex endeavor involving a wide range of oceanographic disciplines. NCCOS scientists and sponsored researchers count the number of harmful algal bloom (HAB) resting stages or cysts that lie on the bottom of the ocean as one method to estimate the future occurrence of HABs. Scientists use a suite of […]

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Hypoxia Special Session Lead by NCCOS at 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting

Leading a special session on advances in hypoxia modelling, scientists from NCCOS contributed to the global mission of the 2015 Aquatic Sciences (ASLO) Meeting in Grenada, Spain which focused on global and regional patterns of aquatic systems. The hypoxia special session highlighted diverse modeling approaches to a variety of issues from the development of hypoxia […]

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Low Oxygen Conditions Increase Parasite Infections in Oysters

A study funded in part by NCCOS has found that diel-cycling hypoxia—daily cycling of high to very low oxygen levels—in shallow coastal waters increases parasite infections in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). The project team tested and confirmed that diel-cycling hypoxia increases eastern oyster susceptibility to Perkinsus marinus infection, most likely by reducing the oxygen carrying capacity […]

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Assessing Future Harmful Algal Bloom Risk for Washington State

In Puget Sound, the toxic alga Alexandrium catenella threatens the health of people who eat shellfish contaminated with toxins it produces. An NCCOS Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) project, Puget Sound Alexandrium Harmful Algal Blooms, annually mapped “seedbeds” of Alexandrium resting stages (cysts) at about 100 locations on the bottom throughout Puget Sound. The project […]

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Upwelling Controls HAB Movement toward Pacific NW Coast

Models developed by NCCOS-sponsored researchers will predict the transport of harmful algal blooms (HABs) to coastal beaches or offshore from two locations off of Washington and Oregon, based on the influence of the Columbia River Plume and seasonal upwelling (displacement of surface water by cool, nutrient rich, deep water). A recent study determined that upwelling plays […]

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Primary Cause of Dead Zones is Biological on Pacific Northwest Continental Shelves

Coastal waters of the northern portion of the California Current System experience a seasonal decline in oxygen concentrations and increasing hypoxia (dead zones) over the summer upwelling season resulting in negative impacts to many organisms. NCCOS-sponsored research modelling determined that plankton respiration was the leading influence on seasonal and interannual fluctuations in oxygen concentration and hypoxia in the […]

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Reducing the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Using Operational Hypoxia Scenario Models

A recently released white paper assesses the status of several empirical and deterministic models capable of characterizing Gulf hypoxia, also known as the Gulf dead zone. “Modeling Approaches for Scenario Forecasts for Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia” presents conclusions from the 2013 joint NOAA and Northern Gulf Institute Forum for the Gulf of Mexico Research and Coordination […]

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Mesophotic Habitats Are a Refuge for Large, Overfished Species in Southwest Puerto Rico

NCCOS-supported research found that commercially important fish, such as snappers and groupers, off southwest Puerto Rico are more abundant at mesophotic depths (60–80 meters) than shallow depths (30 meters or less). The study, published in the journal Coral Reefs, suggests that mesophotic coral ecosystems serve as a refuge for heavily exploited, shallow-water reef species and […]

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