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NOAA “Science to Management” Project Trains Stakeholders in Coral Reef Forensics

NCCOS supported researchers led a May 2015 training event wherein local community members learned to use coral reef “forensics” on reef plants and animals. This activity identified and provided early warning of coral reef stress, death and decay causes. The event, hosted by the citizen conservation group Maui Nui Marine Resource Council on the Hawaiian […]

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NOAA, partners predict an average ‘dead zone’ for Gulf of Mexico

Outlook incorporates multiple hypoxia models for first time Scientists are expecting that this year’s Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, also called the “dead zone,” will be approximately 5,483 square miles or about the size of Connecticut–the same as it has averaged over the last several years. The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico affects […]

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Hypoxia Leads to Pathological, but Reversible, Changes in Fish Brains

The NCCOS sponsored project, Modeling Reproductive and Population Impacts of Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, led by the University of Texas at Austin, is investigating the impacts of low levels of dissolved oxygen on the brain functions of the Atlantic croaker, a common estuarine and coastal fish inhabiting the east coast of the United States. […]

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NOAA Seminar Series Features Patuxent River Shellfish Aquaculture and Eutrophication Research

A scientist from NCCOS’s Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment described a modeling study in Chesapeake Bay region’s Patuxent River Estuary at the NOAA NOS Science Seminar Series on June 3, 2015. The presentation, titled “Shellfish Aquaculture: A Strategy for Eutrophication Mitigation in the Patuxent River,” reported nitrogen removal estimates through cultivation and harvest of oysters […]

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Palau Sustainable Fisheries Supported by NCCOS Science

Recent findings from research conducted in Palau show that in order to manage reef fisheries, both good water quality and an intact biological community are needed.  Their results show that fish larvae respond to both reef sounds and the smells when seeking a place to settle from open water and mature into adults. This NCCOS-supported […]

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Oceanic Continental Margin Dead Zones Emerge as Threats to Coastal Waters

Declines in oxygen levels of coastal waters have accelerated in recent decades creating “dead zones” not only in more publicized nearshore areas but in open ocean offshore regions of the continental shelves and slopes. Once treated as separate phenomena and distinct fields of study, scientists now see offshore and coastal hypoxia as interconnected, resulting in […]

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‘Most Notable Paper’ Awarded to NCCOS Project

A team of researchers funded by NCCOS recently won the 2015 Chandler-Misener Award for the most notable paper published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research (JGLR). The paper, “Assessing and addressing the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: Central basin hypoxia,” synthesizes results from a long-term NCCOS project examining the causes and consequences of hypoxia (low oxygen) […]

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Gulf of Mexico Offshore Dead Zone Linked to Mississippi River Nutrient Inputs

Twenty-five years of NCCOS sponsored research shows that the offshore summer hypoxic (low-oxygen) “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico is strongly linked to nutrient loading from the Mississippi River. Physical forces (i.e., wind, waves, currents, temperature) play an equally strong role as biological variables (i.e., phytoplankton growth/decay, photosynthesis/respiration) in creating and maintaining Louisiana shelf hypoxia […]

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