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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Flexible Transcriptome

Research sponsored by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) discovered that the genetic flexibility of the single-celled harmful algae, Aureococcus anophagefferens, persistently blooms in what are known as “brown tides.” Scientists performed transcriptome profiling (looking at a cell’s RNA produced by gene transcription) on an A. anophagefferens strain to assess its response to common environmental stressors occurring in […]

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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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NOAA Supports Reduction in Gulf of Mexico Nutrient Loading

From August 12 – 14, seven of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife-led Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) convened a workshop in Memphis, Tennessee to improve the allocation of wildlife management actions throughout the Mississippi River Basin in a way that reduces nutrient loading and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, while balancing agricultural interests and supporting terrestrial […]

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NCCOS Project Wins Publication Award

A paper supported by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science project “Multiple Stresses in Mid-Atlantic Shoreline Habitats”  won the 2014 American Water Resources Association (AWRA) Boggess Award for the best paper published in the Journal of the AWRA in the prior year. The paper, “Using Multiple Watershed Models to Predict Water, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus […]

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Workshop Explores Fisheries Management in Face of Mississippi River Diversions and Hypoxia

Last month’s Fifth Annual Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Research Coordination Workshop continued its tradition of advancing the science that informs fisheries and resource managers about the effects of Gulf hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen). The workshop also provided a forum to assess and predict the potential ecological and socioeconomic effects of Mississippi River diversions. Large-scale ecosystem […]

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New Research Funding Opportunities Available for 2015

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) has released three competitive Federal Funding Opportunities for the 2015 Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2014. The competitive Federal Funding Announcements of Opportunity (FFOs), published in Grants.gov, are: 2015 Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program 2015 Northern Gulf of […]

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NCCOS Promotes Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality

Researchers are exploring the role oyster aquaculture may be playing in improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. On July 16, 17, and 23, 2014,  the researchers made visits to three Chesapeake Bay oyster growers to discuss their culture practices, to view their lease areas, and to share information about this joint project. The project also  involves development […]

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Coastal Ocean Acidification: The Other Eutrophication Problem

Eutrophication, or increased nutrient loading to estuaries, causes algae to bloom and consequently coastal hypoxia (low oxygen waters) when the algal biomass decomposes. Often overlooked, eutrophication can also produce carbon dioxide, which leads to a lowering of seawater pH (or increasing acidity). A recent invited paper by scientists supported by NCCOS and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program shows low […]

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