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NCCOS Provides Florida Agency Specialized Training in Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring

Earlier this month, NCCOS researchers provided a visiting scientist from Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (FWC) Red Tide Monitoring Program training on the use of physiological biomarkers for harmful algal bloom monitoring. Coastal blooms of the microscopic alga Karenia brevis, also known as red tides, occur nearly annually in the Gulf of Mexico and […]

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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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New Online Community Created to Improve National HAB Response

NCCOS and the U.S. National Office for HABs established a new listserv to address diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. This emerging harmful algal bloom (HAB) issue has caused shellfish harvesting closures in Washington and Texas, human illness in Washington, and threatens other states. The online community of researchers; national, state, local, and tribal officials and public health […]

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Toxins Detection Workshop Promotes International Trade of Shellfish

NCCOS scientist Tina Mikulski recently led a workshop in Muscat, Oman, on the detection of paralytic shellfish toxins—which can accumulate in shellfish, causing human illness and death. Shellfish must be screened for these toxins (produced by harmful algae in the genus Alexandrium) prior to sale and consumption. The workshop was designed through a formal agreement between […]

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Lecture Informs Public of Long Island’s Coastal Ills, Solutions

NCCOS-funded researcher Dr. Christopher Gobler and his students recently reported on the nearly complete collapse of hard clam fisheries in Great South Bay and bay scallop fisheries off the East End of Long Island due to annually occurring harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, and acidification. The team discovered excess nitrogen entering groundwater from septic tanks and […]

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NOAA Harmful Algae Research Featured at Interstate Seafood Seminar

NCCOS’s Dr. Quay Dortch was a featured speaker at the 66th Interstate Seafood Seminar conference during a session devoted to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their impacts on shellfish safety and shellfish production. Dortch discussed NOAA’s HAB programs and how they enhance state rapid response and build a national capacity to minimize HAB impacts. She also […]

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Algal Community Study Advances Ciguatera Management in Pacific Islands Region

Populations of Gambierdiscus, the algae most often associated with ciguatera fish poisoning, have been found to have only low or moderate toxicity on the western coast of Marakei Island in the Republic of Kiribati—a section of the island considered a high-risk area for ciguatera for decades. This unexpected finding is part of a recent NCCOS-funded […]

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Sentinel Site Alerts California Public to Toxic Shellfish

Routine sampling of marine mussels from a University of California sentinel site at the Santa Cruz Wharf prompted the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) to issue a health advisory warning for domoic acid poisoning due to high levels of the toxin in shellfish samples. The April 4, 2014 advisory warned consumers not to eat recreationally […]

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