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High Tech Sensors Used to Investigate Harmful Algal Bloom ‘Hot Spots’ in California

NCCOS scientists and their partners from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) are investigating the causes of Pseudo-nitzschia blooms and toxicity in Monterey Bay, Calif. from Sept. 5 to Oct. 10. Under the right conditions, some Pseudo-nitzschia produce domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin. Domoic acid accumulates in fish and shellfish, has caused bird and […]

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NCCOS Researchers Inform National Audience on Harmful Algae via EPA Webinar Series

Two internationally acclaimed harmful algal bloom (HAB) researchers with NCCOS affiliations presented the third EPA Webinar Series to Build Awareness About Harmful Algal Blooms and Nutrient Pollution. Dr. Steve Morton of the Marine Biotoxins Program in Charleston, South Carolina teamed with Dr. Don Anderson of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Massachusetts to air the August […]

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Gordon Research Conference Highlights NCCOS Expertise in Harmful Algae Research

At the June 16-21, Mycotoxins & Phycotoxins Gordon Research Conference, NCCOS-sponsored researchers and agency scientists led sessions, gave presentations, and provided expert discussions on algal and cyanobacterial blooms and their toxins that adversely affect humans and wildlife. NCCOS’s Dr. Quay Dortch co-chaired a session entitled “Strategies and Regulation for Prevention and Control” that highlighted strategies and projects […]

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NCCOS Transfers Toxin Detection Method to Maine Start-Up Company to Provide Testing of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) provided training on the NCCOS-developed receptor binding assay (RBA) for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins to visiting scientist Darcie Couture, Lead Scientist from Resource Access International, LLC (RAI LLC) in Brunswick, Maine. The RBA for PSP toxins is a rapid, cost-effective test that measures algal […]

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Mobile Robotic Laboratory Will Track Ocean Toxins: Popular Mechanics Probes the MBARI-NCCOS Research Collaboration

The widely read technology magazine, Popular Mechanics informed its readership about cutting-edge technologies underway at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to expand applications of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), a robotic molecular biology laboratory operating autonomously beneath the ocean’s surface. NCCOS’s primary role in […]

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California HAB Forecasting Highlighted by Major Ocean Research Organization, Online News Service

A NCCOS-funded harmful algal bloom forecasting project is providing key information that one day will help scientists overcome the challenges of HAB forecasting and predict when and where blooms may occur.  The prestigious Monterey Bay Research Institute (MBARI), a partner in the research, recently advertised the NCCOS harmful algal bloom forecasting project in a press […]

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NCCOS Funded-Partners Demonstrate Sustained Offshore HAB Observation Capabilities in Gulf of Maine

An NCCOS-funded research team led by Dr. Donald Anderson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has deployed an autonomous ocean sensor, called the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) in the Atlantic Ocean off Portsmouth, New Hampshire for monitoring and prediction of New England Red Tides.  A key project goal this year is to maintain ESP coverage in […]

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NCCOS and Partners Experiment with First Underwater Robot that Will Remotely Detect Red Tide Toxins in Gulf of Maine

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and partners will conduct the first field test of an underwater robot using an NCCOS-developed toxin sensor that will enable remote, automated measurements of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium that causes toxic red tides in the Gulf of Maine (GOM). The robot, called the […]

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