You are here: Home / News / Harmful Algal Blooms / Archive by category "Sensor Development" (Page 4)

News and Features by Research Area or Topic

Gordon Research Conference Highlights NCCOS Expertise in Harmful Algae Research

At the June 16-21, Mycotoxins & Phycotoxins Gordon Research Conference, NCCOS-sponsored researchers and agency scientists led sessions, gave presentations, and provided expert discussions on algal and cyanobacterial blooms and their toxins that adversely affect humans and wildlife. NCCOS’s Dr. Quay Dortch co-chaired a session entitled “Strategies and Regulation for Prevention and Control” that highlighted strategies and projects […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Transfers Toxin Detection Method to Maine Start-Up Company to Provide Testing of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) provided training on the NCCOS-developed receptor binding assay (RBA) for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins to visiting scientist Darcie Couture, Lead Scientist from Resource Access International, LLC (RAI LLC) in Brunswick, Maine. The RBA for PSP toxins is a rapid, cost-effective test that measures algal […]

Continue reading

Mobile Robotic Laboratory Will Track Ocean Toxins: Popular Mechanics Probes the MBARI-NCCOS Research Collaboration

The widely read technology magazine, Popular Mechanics informed its readership about cutting-edge technologies underway at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to expand applications of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), a robotic molecular biology laboratory operating autonomously beneath the ocean’s surface. NCCOS’s primary role in […]

Continue reading

California HAB Forecasting Highlighted by Major Ocean Research Organization, Online News Service

A NCCOS-funded harmful algal bloom forecasting project is providing key information that one day will help scientists overcome the challenges of HAB forecasting and predict when and where blooms may occur.  The prestigious Monterey Bay Research Institute (MBARI), a partner in the research, recently advertised the NCCOS harmful algal bloom forecasting project in a press […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Funded-Partners Demonstrate Sustained Offshore HAB Observation Capabilities in Gulf of Maine

An NCCOS-funded research team led by Dr. Donald Anderson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has deployed an autonomous ocean sensor, called the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) in the Atlantic Ocean off Portsmouth, New Hampshire for monitoring and prediction of New England Red Tides.  A key project goal this year is to maintain ESP coverage in […]

Continue reading

NCCOS and Partners Experiment with First Underwater Robot that Will Remotely Detect Red Tide Toxins in Gulf of Maine

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and partners will conduct the first field test of an underwater robot using an NCCOS-developed toxin sensor that will enable remote, automated measurements of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium that causes toxic red tides in the Gulf of Maine (GOM). The robot, called the […]

Continue reading

Underwater Ocean Observing Robots Sniff Out Signs of Toxic Algae

Two autonomous robotic Environmental Sample Processors capable of detecting the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and its potent neurotoxin domoic acid were deployed off Huntington Beach, California in March as part of a novel ocean observing network. These underwater laboratories transmit data to shore from a toxin sensor designed by a researcher from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal […]

Continue reading

New Technologies and Platforms Transforming Oceanography

The journal Science recently declared that new technologies are making remote sensing of the ocean a “new wave” of oceanography. This growing array of lower-cost, high-tech instruments–satellites, robotic gliders, moored sensors, underwater observatories–is transforming the discipline of oceanography, possibly reducing the need for expensive research vessels. A new class of automated biological sensors are nearing […]

Continue reading