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NCCOS Prepares Toxin Sensor for Gulf of Maine Red Tide Forecasting

An NCCOS technical expert completed critical calibrations of the paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin sensor for an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) platform stationed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Laboratory for Ocean Sensors and Observing Systems (LOSOS). Beginning in early May, this ESP will perform autonomous, near real-time monitoring of toxins associated with cells of the red […]

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NCCOS Leads Efforts to Prioritize Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom Research

In 2014 access to drinking water in Toledo, Ohio was shut down due to cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins from Lake Erie. The National Science Foundation and NOAA responded with a workshop,“Global Solutions to Regional Problems: Collecting Global Expertise to Address the Problem of Harmful Algal Blooms,” at Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, April 13-14, […]

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Technology Transfer of Toxin Detection Methods to South Korean Researchers

Two researchers from the Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST) visited the NCCOS Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research (CCEHBR) laboratory in Charleston, SC for two weeks of intensive training on the use of mass spectrometry to detect several algal toxin classes, including domoic acid (DA), paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), and […]

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NCCOS Hosts Visiting Scientists

Collaboration to Identify Ecologically Important Areas in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary NCCOS Biogeography Branch staff are working with visiting scholar Daniel Mateos-Molina, on methods to identify ecologically important areas in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Daniel is a Marie Curie fellow in a project funded by the European Commission for Monitoring Mediterranean Marine […]

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NCCOS Works to Track and Eliminate Freshwater Algal Toxins

A new study has documented the fate of microcystins—the most common of the freshwater blue-green algae toxins—and the challenges for monitoring them. The study is part of a larger NCCOS-sponsored project whose goal is to identify bacteria capable of degrading microcystins and to develop an affordable and efficient water filtration system to house such microorganisms. Microcystins inhibit and […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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NCCOS Partners with White House to Improve Detection of Excess Nutrients in Aquatic Environments

Earlier this month, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and other partners joined the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC for a workshop to accelerate the development and adoption of nutrient sensors. Excessive amounts of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) entering lakes, rivers, streams, and coastal waters are causing […]

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Gulf of Mexico Alliance Produces Guide for Monitoring Harmful Algal Toxins

To improve the efficacy and consistency of toxin assessments and response, the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) produced a guide for Gulf state managers on harmful algal bloom toxin monitoring protocols. GOMA collaborated with federal, state, academic, and NGO partners to advance Gulf ecosystem management through a coordinated, consensus-based approach. The National Centers for Coastal […]

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