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New Pathogen and HAB Detection Device Designed with Volunteers in Mind

NCCOS-funded researchers at the University of Maine have developed a new, hand-held device for pathogen detection. The portable, easy-to-use, and inexpensive design of this sensor meets key use needs of volunteer and government public health, water, and shellfish monitoring personnel. Researchers plan to give these instruments to Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR) harmful algal […]

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Galveston Bay Closed to Oyster Harvesting After Scientists Detect Toxic Algal Bloom

The Texas Department of State Health Services is temporarily closing all of the Galveston Bay system to the harvesting of oysters, clams, and mussels because of elevated levels of an alga that can produce a toxin in some shellfish. NCCOS-funded scientists at Texas A&M University detected the harmful algal bloom and notified the state agency, […]

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Identifying Origin and Mechanism of Texas Red Tide

A study funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science has tentatively identified the source and control mechanism of red tides (Karenia brevis) along the Texas coast. The research, led by Texas A&M University, incorporates a suite of linked models (e.g., biological–physical), combined with data from drifting sensors, satellites, and an automated underwater microscope […]

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NCCOS-developed Method for Toxins Detection Approved for Regulatory Testing of Shellfish in the U.S

Earlier this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) approved a new assay developed by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) as an official method for identifying toxicity that could result in paralytic shellfish poisoning. This approval is the culmination of more than a decade of effort to find an alternative to live animal […]

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NCCOS Research Featured in EPA Webinar Series on Inland Harmful Algal Blooms

On Jan. 14, NCCOS researchers Steve Morton and Rick Stumpf were featured speakers at an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) webinar focused on inland harmful algal blooms. The event was part of an EPA webinar series intended to build awareness about the effects of nutrient pollution and harmful algal blooms on the environment. Dr. Morton provided […]

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NCCOS Research in Today’s Rapidly Changing Global Environment

Two national science conferences recently highlighted NCCOS research: The theme at the 7th Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States (Oct. 27–31, 2013; Sarasota, FL) was harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a changing world, especially a more acidic one. NCCOS HAB scientists and sponsored researchers  organized, advised,  chaired sessions, and presented some 13 oral […]

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NCCOS Calibrates Harmful Algal Bloom Toxin Sensors in California

An NCCOS scientist visited the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on Nov. 6–13 to perform critical calibration of NCCOS-developed domoic acid sensors on two robotic Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs). Results of these calibrations and the analysis of controlled test samples will allow researchers to accurately quantify harmful algal bloom toxin data generated during two ESP […]

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High Tech Sensors Used to Investigate Harmful Algal Bloom ‘Hot Spots’ in California

NCCOS scientists and their partners from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) are investigating the causes of Pseudo-nitzschia blooms and toxicity in Monterey Bay, Calif. from Sept. 5 to Oct. 10. Under the right conditions, some Pseudo-nitzschia produce domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin. Domoic acid accumulates in fish and shellfish, has caused bird and […]

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