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New Research Shows Both Blooms and Toxicity of Harmful Freshwater Blue-Green Algae Controlled by Nutrients; Genetic Adaptability is Key

In freshwaters around the world blooms of cyanobacteria (commonly known as blue-green algae) are considered a serious health problem due to their potential to release toxins that can poison and kill humans, pets and livestock. What controls the growth of these cyanobacteria and their associated toxicity? New NCCOS-sponsored research shows how harmful cyanobacteria blooms in […]

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Blood Monitoring Supports Response and Rehabilitation of Algae-poisoned Sea Turtles

Sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are long-lived animals that are valuable indicator species of environmental health. They are subject to multiple hazards, such as pollutants and natural toxins, including the algae-produced brevetoxin. NCCOS scientists who pioneered the use of blood collection cards are working in cooperation with wildlife managers in Florida to measure […]

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Algae’s hunger ramps up red tide toxins | HeraldTribune.com

The mysterious red tide toxin that has killed a record number of manatees and brought countless dead fish to Southwest Florida beaches over the past few months could finally have an explanation: The algae that produce the toxin are hungry. A significant new study of the algae, Karenia Brevis (sic), suggests that the organisms release […]

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Recreational Water Pathogen Detection Workshops Build Skills for State Labs

The North Carolina Biotechnology Center funded NOAA and academic researchers to develop a training facility for public health officials and resource managers in advanced molecular methods to detect pathogens and harmful algae species more quickly and effectively. The first workshop, held March 11 – 15, 2013,  covered quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques to detect Enterococcus, the […]

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Gulf of Mexico Algae Shield Themselves with Toxins When Hungry

A species of algae responsible for red tides plaguing Gulf coast communities protects itself by becoming highly toxic when it’s hungry and vulnerable to being eaten by predators, say scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and North Carolina State University. The red tide organism, called Karenia brevis, reacts to low levels of nutrients–particularly phosphorus–by […]

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Cheaper Ciguatoxin Assay May Rely on Proxy Molecule

A recently published finding may contribute to the development of a long-elusive affordable ciguatoxin detector, crucial for equatorial peoples worldwide at risk of contracting a severe type of seafood poisoning. While researching toxicity differences in the several species of tropical algae that cause ciguatera, researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and partners […]

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Massive fish kill continues in the Neuse River – Local – Sun Journal

A massive fish kill on the Neuse River that has been ongoing for nearly a month has resulted in thousands of menhaden washed up on beaches near Neuse Harbor. Mitch Blake, Neuse Riverkeeper, viewed the area Tuesday afternoon, saying there were several hundred thousand dead fish washed up on the beach and in the river. […]

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