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Working with State to Document First Occurrence of Harmful Karenia mikimotoi Algae in Alaskan Waters

Starting in late Sept. 2013, a bloom of the phytoplankton Karenia mikimotoi began, progressed, and ultimately covered most of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. The bloom caused the water to turn brown and foam at the surface for several weeks, causing concern in local communities. In response, the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NCCOS […]

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Programmed Cell Death and the Decline of Harmful Algal Blooms

Programmed cell death, or self-induced cell mortality, is the subject of increasing attention and research efforts. All phytoplankton blooms decline for a variety of reasons—nutrient depletion, zooplankton grazing, virus infections, sedimentation—but programmed cell death as a means to bloom termination is a new concept, and one not well understood. Dr. Deana Erdner, an NCCOS-sponsored researcher […]

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NCCOS Research in Today’s Rapidly Changing Global Environment

Two national science conferences recently highlighted NCCOS research: The theme at the 7th Symposium on Harmful Algae in the United States (Oct. 27–31, 2013; Sarasota, FL) was harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a changing world, especially a more acidic one. NCCOS HAB scientists and sponsored researchers  organized, advised,  chaired sessions, and presented some 13 oral […]

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NCCOS Contributes to European Union Workshop on Algal Toxin, Azaspiracid

NCCOS concluded its contribution to a three-year project funded by the Irish Marine Institute on the algal toxin, azaspiracid, with presentations at the final Dissemination & Stakeholder Workshop held in Galway, Republic of Ireland on September 10, 2013. The presentations focused on toxicological studies conducted in partnership with the University of Michigan-Dearborn that have identified […]

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New Research Shows Both Blooms and Toxicity of Harmful Freshwater Blue-Green Algae Controlled by Nutrients; Genetic Adaptability is Key

In freshwaters around the world blooms of cyanobacteria (commonly known as blue-green algae) are considered a serious health problem due to their potential to release toxins that can poison and kill humans, pets and livestock. What controls the growth of these cyanobacteria and their associated toxicity? New NCCOS-sponsored research shows how harmful cyanobacteria blooms in […]

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Blood Monitoring Supports Response and Rehabilitation of Algae-poisoned Sea Turtles

Sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico are long-lived animals that are valuable indicator species of environmental health. They are subject to multiple hazards, such as pollutants and natural toxins, including the algae-produced brevetoxin. NCCOS scientists who pioneered the use of blood collection cards are working in cooperation with wildlife managers in Florida to measure […]

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Algae’s hunger ramps up red tide toxins | HeraldTribune.com

The mysterious red tide toxin that has killed a record number of manatees and brought countless dead fish to Southwest Florida beaches over the past few months could finally have an explanation: The algae that produce the toxin are hungry. A significant new study of the algae, Karenia Brevis (sic), suggests that the organisms release […]

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Recreational Water Pathogen Detection Workshops Build Skills for State Labs

The North Carolina Biotechnology Center funded NOAA and academic researchers to develop a training facility for public health officials and resource managers in advanced molecular methods to detect pathogens and harmful algae species more quickly and effectively. The first workshop, held March 11 – 15, 2013,  covered quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques to detect Enterococcus, the […]

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