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Identifying Origin and Mechanism of Texas Red Tide

A study funded by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science has tentatively identified the source and control mechanism of red tides (Karenia brevis) along the Texas coast. The research, led by Texas A&M University, incorporates a suite of linked models (e.g., biological–physical), combined with data from drifting sensors, satellites, and an automated underwater microscope […]

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Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

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South Florida Field Radiometry to Support Cyanobacteria Bloom Detection in Lake Okeechobee

NCCOS staff recently trained several employees of the South Florida Water Management District on the collection of field radiometry for cyanobacteria algorithm development. Radiometry is the measurement of optical radiant energy. As a result of nutrient inputs to Lake Okeechobee, blooms of Anabaena, Microcystis, and other cyanobacteria commonly occur, discoloring the water, producing noxious odors, and making […]

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Working to Reduce Toxic Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored researchers recently explored several promising techniques to mitigate toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms in the Chesapeake Bay region. The team focused on sediment-flocculation, in which local sediments and commercial clays are combined with the flocculating compound chitosan to sink and bury Microcystis cyanobacteria blooms. Other techniques evaluated included post-bloom flushing and early spring deployment of […]

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NCCOS-developed Method for Toxins Detection Approved for Regulatory Testing of Shellfish in the U.S

Earlier this year, the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) approved a new assay developed by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) as an official method for identifying toxicity that could result in paralytic shellfish poisoning. This approval is the culmination of more than a decade of effort to find an alternative to live animal […]

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Working with State to Document First Occurrence of Harmful Karenia mikimotoi Algae in Alaskan Waters

Starting in late Sept. 2013, a bloom of the phytoplankton Karenia mikimotoi began, progressed, and ultimately covered most of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. The bloom caused the water to turn brown and foam at the surface for several weeks, causing concern in local communities. In response, the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NCCOS […]

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Programmed Cell Death and the Decline of Harmful Algal Blooms

Programmed cell death, or self-induced cell mortality, is the subject of increasing attention and research efforts. All phytoplankton blooms decline for a variety of reasons—nutrient depletion, zooplankton grazing, virus infections, sedimentation—but programmed cell death as a means to bloom termination is a new concept, and one not well understood. Dr. Deana Erdner, an NCCOS-sponsored researcher […]

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Supporting Virginia Sea Grant Aquaculture Work

At the Virginia Sea Grant’s Annual Symposium held in Richmond, Va. on Jan. 23, researchers from NCCOS, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and private industry developed strategies to find and forecast harmful algal blooms to support Virginia’s growing shellfish aquaculture industry. Participants representing research, industry, and government also discussed strategies that would allow Virginia […]

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