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Harmful Algal Bloom Intensity May be Tied to Ocean Carbon Dioxide Levels

Recent findings show that increases in oceanic carbon dioxidefrom the burning of fossil fuels over the last 200 years may have increased the intensity and toxicity of Karenia brevis blooms. Researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) report that this effect is projected to increase substantially by the turn of the century with […]

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Improving Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Response in Alaska

Harmful algal blooms, particularly those that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning, pose a threat to human health, food security, and the economy of local communities in Alaska. There is a need for greater understanding of these blooms by community members and for the development of an effective and integrated monitoring system. To meet these needs, NCCOS […]

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Galveston Bay Closed to Oyster Harvesting After Scientists Detect Toxic Algal Bloom

The Texas Department of State Health Services is temporarily closing all of the Galveston Bay system to the harvesting of oysters, clams, and mussels because of elevated levels of an alga that can produce a toxin in some shellfish. NCCOS-funded scientists at Texas A&M University detected the harmful algal bloom and notified the state agency, […]

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Ocean Sciences Meeting Highlights Results of Sponsored Research

The 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting showcased the reach and extent of research sponsored by NCCOS, including coral reefs, harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, applying research to management solutions, and integrated ecosystem assessments. NCCOS staff and sponsored research scientists gave over 25 oral and poster presentations and co-chaired a special session on mapping, monitoring, and managing mesophotic […]

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South Florida Field Radiometry to Support Cyanobacteria Bloom Detection in Lake Okeechobee

NCCOS staff recently trained several employees of the South Florida Water Management District on the collection of field radiometry for cyanobacteria algorithm development. Radiometry is the measurement of optical radiant energy. As a result of nutrient inputs to Lake Okeechobee, blooms of Anabaena, Microcystis, and other cyanobacteria commonly occur, discoloring the water, producing noxious odors, and making […]

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Working with State to Document First Occurrence of Harmful Karenia mikimotoi Algae in Alaskan Waters

Starting in late Sept. 2013, a bloom of the phytoplankton Karenia mikimotoi began, progressed, and ultimately covered most of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. The bloom caused the water to turn brown and foam at the surface for several weeks, causing concern in local communities. In response, the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NCCOS […]

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NCCOS Research Featured in EPA Webinar Series on Inland Harmful Algal Blooms

On Jan. 14, NCCOS researchers Steve Morton and Rick Stumpf were featured speakers at an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) webinar focused on inland harmful algal blooms. The event was part of an EPA webinar series intended to build awareness about the effects of nutrient pollution and harmful algal blooms on the environment. Dr. Morton provided […]

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Ocean Acidification Promotes Disruptive and Harmful Algal Blooms on Our Coasts

The general decline in ocean pH (i.e., more acidic conditions) from the increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) is well documented. Also well documented are increased nutrients entering coastal waters often promoting excessive and ecosystem disruptive algae blooms, including harmful algal blooms. The decay of these coastal blooms promotes bacterial respiration resulting in increased CO2, […]

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