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NCCOS helps Pennsylvania Prepare for Lake Erie Blooms

When Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett learned of the large toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) bloom that disrupted the drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of Ohio’s citizens, he expressed confidence his state was proactively planning to mitigate any potential human health impacts from toxic cyanobacteria blooms. This confidence grew from the state Department of Environmental Protection […]

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NCCOS and “Phytofinders” Identify and Respond to Red Tide Event in North Carolina

Students from First Flight High School participating as “Phytofinders” for the NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) identified the non-toxic, single-celled organism Mesodinium rubrum as the cause of a red tide bloom near Bodie and Pea Island, North Carolina. The bloom was first reported on October 27, 2014 to NOAA though the NCCOS Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) harmful […]

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NCCOS Leads International Effort to Reduce Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

To reduce incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) and increase safety of seafood consumption around the world, scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) are leading international efforts to develop a global strategy to improve Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) monitoring and prediction. The strategy, endorsed by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, was one of […]

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Additional Toxin Data Helped Ohio Deliver Safe Drinking Water After August Cyanobacteria Bloom

Persistent concerns about toxins in Toledo, Ohio’s drinking water following August’s large, cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Erie prompted a follow-up investigation supported by NCCOS. At the time, the bloom led the City of Toledo to issue a two-day, drinking water ban for 400,000 people in Toledo and surrounding areas after drinking water samples showed high […]

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NCCOS Partners with White House to Improve Detection of Excess Nutrients in Aquatic Environments

Earlier this month, NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and other partners joined the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in Washington, DC for a workshop to accelerate the development and adoption of nutrient sensors. Excessive amounts of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) entering lakes, rivers, streams, and coastal waters are causing […]

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Gulf of Mexico Alliance Produces Guide for Monitoring Harmful Algal Toxins

To improve the efficacy and consistency of toxin assessments and response, the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) produced a guide for Gulf state managers on harmful algal bloom toxin monitoring protocols. GOMA collaborated with federal, state, academic, and NGO partners to advance Gulf ecosystem management through a coordinated, consensus-based approach. The National Centers for Coastal […]

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Glider Begins Second Deployment to Monitor Threatening Florida Red Tide

A red tide of Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico continues its slow advance toward Florida’s southwest coast. NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) rapid response emergency funding is supporting a second deployment of underwater robotic gliders to track subsurface movement of the red tide. Since mid-July, a large red tide has lingered […]

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New Research Funding Opportunities Available for 2015

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) has released three competitive Federal Funding Opportunities for the 2015 Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2014. The competitive Federal Funding Announcements of Opportunity (FFOs), published in Grants.gov, are: 2015 Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program 2015 Northern Gulf of […]

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