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Common Coastal Seaweeds Release Toxins Harmful to Marine Organisms

A new study has found that compounds excreted by common coastal green seaweeds, or sea lettuce, detrimentally affect other organisms. The green seaweed Ulvaria obscura forms blooms in the intertidal and subtidal zones. During high spring tides, this seaweed strands on the shore and succumbs to drying, high levels of sunlight, and high temperatures. These […]

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NCCOS Provides Florida Agency Specialized Training in Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring

Earlier this month, NCCOS researchers provided a visiting scientist from Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (FWC) Red Tide Monitoring Program training on the use of physiological biomarkers for harmful algal bloom monitoring. Coastal blooms of the microscopic alga Karenia brevis, also known as red tides, occur nearly annually in the Gulf of Mexico and […]

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NOAA Forecasts and Responds to Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom

NOAA scientists are supporting the response to a bloom of cyanobacteria that contaminated drinking water in Lake Erie on August 2nd, leaving nearly 400,000 in Toledo, OH without drinking water for two days.  NOAA’s weekly Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Bulletin tracks the size and location of blooms and predicts their movement until the bloom […]

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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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The National Coral Reef Monitoring Program begins “Puerto Rico” Phase

This summer, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) researchers began collecting data on coral reefs around the island of Puerto Rico to help local natural resource managers address coral reef management concerns as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program’s “Puerto Rico phase.” This program collects standardized biological, physical, and socioeconomic monitoring data […]

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Congress Reauthorizes National Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Legislation

On June 17, 2014, Congress passed a reauthorization of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA)—legislation last reauthorized in 2004. HABHRCA is critical for protecting the public from these environmental events, as well as furthering NOAA’s goals to maintain healthy oceans and build resilient coastal communities and economies. In a roll call […]

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Lecture Informs Public of Long Island’s Coastal Ills, Solutions

NCCOS-funded researcher Dr. Christopher Gobler and his students recently reported on the nearly complete collapse of hard clam fisheries in Great South Bay and bay scallop fisheries off the East End of Long Island due to annually occurring harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, and acidification. The team discovered excess nitrogen entering groundwater from septic tanks and […]

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NOAA Harmful Algae Research Featured at Interstate Seafood Seminar

NCCOS’s Dr. Quay Dortch was a featured speaker at the 66th Interstate Seafood Seminar conference during a session devoted to harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their impacts on shellfish safety and shellfish production. Dortch discussed NOAA’s HAB programs and how they enhance state rapid response and build a national capacity to minimize HAB impacts. She also […]

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