You are here: Home / News / Harmful Algal Blooms / Archive by category "Forecasting"

News and Features by Research Area or Topic

NOAA and Partners Demonstrate Value of HAB Early Warning in Oregon

Early Warning of Oregon HAB Events In July 2010, NOAA and Oregon partners forecasted rising algae cell and toxin levels nearshore, providing state officials advance warning of a coast-wide harmful algal bloom (HAB) event and prompting proactive shellfish testing. The prediction was verified when further testing revealed that levels of the HAB toxin domoic acid […]

Continue reading

NCCOS and “Phytofinders” Identify and Respond to Red Tide Event in North Carolina

Students from First Flight High School participating as “Phytofinders” for the NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) identified the non-toxic, single-celled organism Mesodinium rubrum as the cause of a red tide bloom near Bodie and Pea Island, North Carolina. The bloom was first reported on October 27, 2014 to NOAA though the NCCOS Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) harmful […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Leads International Effort to Reduce Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

To reduce incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) and increase safety of seafood consumption around the world, scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) are leading international efforts to develop a global strategy to improve Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) monitoring and prediction. The strategy, endorsed by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, was one of […]

Continue reading

NCCOS Embarks on Harmful Algal Cyst Sampling Cruise

Scientists from NCCOS and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution embark today aboard NOAA’s research ship, the Okeanos Explorer, on a nine-day sediment sampling mission in the Gulf of Maine. Researchers will examine sediment cores for the presence of cysts of the harmful alga Alexandrium fundyense to improve forecasting of harmful algal bloom (HAB) events along the […]

Continue reading

Glider Begins Second Deployment to Monitor Threatening Florida Red Tide

A red tide of Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico continues its slow advance toward Florida’s southwest coast. NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) rapid response emergency funding is supporting a second deployment of underwater robotic gliders to track subsurface movement of the red tide. Since mid-July, a large red tide has lingered […]

Continue reading

Next-generation HAB Detectors are Smaller, Cheaper, and Getting Attention

Two instruments developed with NCCOS support are revolutionizing the detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs). The Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP, and the Imaging Flow Cytobot, or IFCB, are receiving more attention from scientists and managers and are the focus of an August 2014 article in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. The article describes the […]

Continue reading

NOAA Forecasts and Responds to Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom

NOAA scientists are supporting the response to a bloom of cyanobacteria that contaminated drinking water in Lake Erie on August 2nd, leaving nearly 400,000 in Toledo, OH without drinking water for two days.  NOAA’s weekly Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Bulletin tracks the size and location of blooms and predicts their movement until the bloom […]

Continue reading

Average 2014 Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Confirms NOAA-supported Forecast

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science supported scientists documented that the 2014 “dead zone” (area of hypoxia, or low oxygen) in the northern Gulf of Mexico west of the Mississippi River delta now covers 5,052 square miles of sea floor, or about the size of the state of Connecticut. Though average in size and smaller than last year, […]

Continue reading