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Shellfisheries Reopen at Georges Bank, Massachusetts | NOS feature story

Something good is happening at Georges Bank, a large area off the coast of Massachusetts that separates the Gulf of Maine from the Atlantic Ocean: After 22 years, some 6,000 square miles of the sea floor recently reopened for surf clam and ocean quahog fishing. Together, the two bivalve species comprise a multimillion-dollar fishery along […]

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Scientists seek solutions to Lake Erie algae – Associated Press

Scientists are developing proposals for dealing with the worsening problem of harmful algae in Lake Erie. Experts from the U.S. and Canada met Monday and Tuesday in Windsor, Ontario, to discuss findings from research into blue-green algae blooms on the lake. They are toxic and have caused animal deaths. The scientists are examining sources of […]

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Environmental Concerns of Modifying Algae for Biofuel Reviewed

As researchers around the world work on better genetic modifications to algae that step up biofuel production, NOAA scientists recently considered some ecological, economic and health ramifications if these organisms made it into the wild. In their paper, the investigators from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean science and partners predict that most genetic traits for enhanced […]

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Seattle researchers discover breakthrough in shellfish toxins | KING5.com Seattle

It was 25 years ago this month that more than a hundred people were sickened on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Three people died. Days later it was confirmed they suffered from a domoic acid in locally cultivated mussels. Domoic acid in high levels can cause immediate neurotoxin reactions like spasms or seizures or memory loss, […]

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Golden Algae Toxin Identified, Detection and Monitoring Tools Developed

Researchers finally identified the main toxic compounds produced by Prymnesium parvum, also known as “golden tide.” A fish-killing algae, this organism had historically affected aquaculture and marine systems worldwide, but now also frequently plagues popular fishing spots in the western United States, such as in Arizona last month. Identifying these toxins as well as their primary mode of […]

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University of the Virgin Islands Ciguatera Researcher wins NOAA Grant

Dr. Tyler Smith, a scientist with the University of the Virgin Islands Center for Marine and Environmental Studies in St. Thomas, was recently awarded a NOAA grant to study to understand factors influencing the occurrence of ciguatera fish poisoning and develop methods to predict outbreaks.  Dr. Smith is partnering with colleagues from around the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and Florida […]

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Fish-Killing Algae Species Evades Predators to Survive and Bloom

A recently published study into how Heterosigma rapidly forms blooms discovered a remarkable behavior: they flee. This fish-killing species of microscopic plant swims away when it senses single-celled predators are feeding on others nearby. In response, they take “shelter” in low salinity water layers which the predators find intolerable. The investigators said they had never seen a plant swim […]

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Excess Algae Responsible for Hotspots of Increased Ocean Acidification

A research paper published this week reveals that large die-offs of algae locally magnify ocean acidification. As the cells die and sinks to the bottom, the bacteria population that feeds on them swells in response, consuming more oxygen and releasing more carbon dioxide (CO2). The CO2 reacts in seawater to form acidic compounds that lower […]

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