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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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How Climate Change Could Impact Harmful Algal Blooms

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are projected to increase as sea surface temperatures rise and ocean acidification continues according to Dr. Alan Lewitus, of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. His findings were shared during a symposium at George Mason University in October which covered such topics as climate change and extreme weather effects on […]

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NCCOS Leads International Effort to Reduce Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

To reduce incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) and increase safety of seafood consumption around the world, scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) are leading international efforts to develop a global strategy to improve Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) monitoring and prediction. The strategy, endorsed by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, was one of […]

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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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Algal Toxins Pose Health Risk to Dogs

Harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, including microcystins, pose health threats and even death for dogs and other pets exposed to the contaminated water, explains a new educational brochure from the New York Sea Grant Program. The brochure, a product of a National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science sponsored research project in the Great Lakes, describes freshwater HABs and their […]

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Glider Begins Second Deployment to Monitor Threatening Florida Red Tide

A red tide of Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico continues its slow advance toward Florida’s southwest coast. NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) rapid response emergency funding is supporting a second deployment of underwater robotic gliders to track subsurface movement of the red tide. Since mid-July, a large red tide has lingered […]

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NCCOS Scientist to Advise Shellfish Sanitation Experts on Harmful Algae Lab Methods

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Dr. Quay Dortch will join the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) as an expert advisor. Dr. Dortch’s advice and expertise will contribute to one of the most technical and specialized areas of shellfish sanitation, that of laboratory methods for detecting and testing harmful algal toxins and their syndromes. […]

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