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Automated Sensor Provides Texas with Early Warning of Red Tide

Last week, an NCCOS-funded sensor installed on a Port Aransas pier alerted Texas agencies to rising concentrations of Karenia brevis, the marine dinoflagellate that causes red tides. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and other interested managers received a two-week early warning that a red tide bloom was […]

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Tenacity of Brown Tides Linked to Genetic Flexibility

The genetic flexibility of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the harmful alga responsible for “brown tides” off Long Island, allows it to thrive in conditions other algae cannot tolerate. NCCOS-sponsored scientists assessed this alga’s response to environmental stressors, such as low nutrients and low light, by looking at pieces of its RNA, which tell Aureococcus which proteins to […]

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What Powers Florida Red Tides?

The results of a long-term research project, sponsored by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, focused on the Gulf of Mexico red tide are featured in a special issue of the scientific journal Harmful Algae. History records blooms of the harmful Florida red tide (caused by the microalgal dinoflagellate Karenia brevis) occurring centuries before Florida’s mid-late […]

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Algal Toxins Pose Health Risk to Dogs

Harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, including microcystins, pose health threats and even death for dogs and other pets exposed to the contaminated water, explains a new educational brochure from the New York Sea Grant Program. The brochure, a product of a National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science sponsored research project in the Great Lakes, describes freshwater HABs and their […]

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Glider Begins Second Deployment to Monitor Threatening Florida Red Tide

A red tide of Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico continues its slow advance toward Florida’s southwest coast. NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) rapid response emergency funding is supporting a second deployment of underwater robotic gliders to track subsurface movement of the red tide. Since mid-July, a large red tide has lingered […]

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NCCOS Scientist to Advise Shellfish Sanitation Experts on Harmful Algae Lab Methods

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Dr. Quay Dortch will join the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) as an expert advisor. Dr. Dortch’s advice and expertise will contribute to one of the most technical and specialized areas of shellfish sanitation, that of laboratory methods for detecting and testing harmful algal toxins and their syndromes. […]

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Common Coastal Seaweeds Release Toxins Harmful to Marine Organisms

A new study has found that compounds excreted by common coastal green seaweeds, or sea lettuce, detrimentally affect other organisms. The green seaweed Ulvaria obscura forms blooms in the intertidal and subtidal zones. During high spring tides, this seaweed strands on the shore and succumbs to drying, high levels of sunlight, and high temperatures. These […]

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New Research Funding Opportunities Available for 2015

The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s (NCCOS) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) has released three competitive Federal Funding Opportunities for the 2015 Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2014. The competitive Federal Funding Announcements of Opportunity (FFOs), published in Grants.gov, are: 2015 Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program 2015 Northern Gulf of […]

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