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Identifying Potential Effects of Land-based Pollution on Corals in St. Croix East End Marine Park

NCCOS has released a new study—“Land-Sea Characterization of the St. Croix East End Marine Park”—that highlights the potential influence of land-based pollution on nearshore coral reef ecosystems and documents the diversity, condition, and composition of biological communities within the park. The findings support local management priority setting for conservation of coral reef ecosystems by identifying and […]

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International MMA Managers Rely on NCCOS Study to Protect Coral Reefs in the Samoan Archipelago

NCCOS’s Biogeographic Assessment of the Samoan Archipelago served as the basis of some workshop activities at the “Two Samoas Reef Resilience Workshop for Marine Managed Area Practitioners” held recently in Pago Pago, American Samoa. Representatives from the Samoan and American Samoan governments, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National […]

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Graduate Student to Research Stable Isotopes in Pygmy Sperm Whale Teeth

College of Charleston Master’s student, Nicole Montey, under the direction of a scientist from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Wayne McFee, was one of two students recently awarded the Master of Environmental Studies Graduate Assistantship for student research and travel. Nicole’s research will use stable isotope analysis of teeth from pygmy sperm whales to determine […]

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Funds Aiding Therapeutic Improvements for Manatees Afflicted by Red Tide

In order to develop better methods of treatment, a researcher from the Mote Marine Lab received harmful algal bloom Event Response Program funds to investigate the physiological effects of brevetoxin exposure on manatees. A persistent red tide bloom of algae that produces this substance is responsible for a record number of manatee deaths this spring (2013). Mote is working […]

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Toxic Turtles: Long-lasting Chemicals Could Be Harming Sea Turtles | Environmental Health News

From the moment they are born, sea turtles fight to survive. Buried alive, they dig themselves out and evade hungry crabs and birds as they crawl to the ocean, where they begin a long and treacherous migration. One out of 1,000 will survive into adulthood. And those that do will bear a toxic burden. Scientists […]

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Research Provides Parameters to Model Ciguatoxin’s Effects on Seals and Humans

A single-celled plant known as Gambierdiscus is responsible for the most common cause of harmful algae poisoning worldwide: ciguatera.  The algae’s potent neurotoxin–called ciguatoxin–is found in over 400 species of fish and is conservatively estimated to sicken more than 50,000 people every year. Two years ago, researchers from NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science […]

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NOAA Scientists: Fish Spawning Hotspots Located by New Technology

Scientists at the Caribbean Coral Reef Institute at the University of Puerto Rico identified locations and size of reef fish spawning aggregations by the sounds they make.  The success of many commercially valuable species in the Caribbean requires annual spawning aggregations of reef fishes; aggregation behavior creates extreme vulnerability to overfishing. The scientists developed a […]

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Tracking Coral Larvae Sources Helps Protection Plan Development

NOAA investigators and their partners embarked on a year-long study to determine the origins of coral polyps and fish species seeding the reefs of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Guam so that the islands’ officials can take customized measures to protect them from overharvesting or other damage. Using  drifting sensors coupled with a computer […]

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