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Algae plaguing the Indian River Lagoon was identified recently by scientists as serious trouble for fish and plants. – OrlandoSentinel.com

Scientists have preliminary confirmation that the algae clobbering vital sea grass and many kinds of popular fish in the Indian River Lagoon is a super-tiny plant with a big name that is otherwise known as “brown tide.” The algae, Aureoumbra lagunensis, is so minuscule that billions of them can grow in every quart of lagoon […]

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Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring Protocol Delivered to North Carolina Resource Managers

A recent assessment of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) monitoring programs revealed a global decline in the underwater plants’ abundance even though they are recognized worldwide for their many important ecological functions such as providing essential habitat for many commercially important species of fish, shellfish, and invertebrates. North Carolina has the third largest total area of SAV between Maine […]

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Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon – Orlando Sentinel

The lagoon that hugs much of Florida’s east coast and has the richest array of marine plants, fish and wildlife in North America is under attack from the worst known outbreak of harmful algae in its history. A large portion of the Indian River Lagoon, an essential estuary for everything from manatees and sea turtles […]

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Can seagrass save the world’s coral reefs? – thestar.com

Does seagrass hold the secret to saving the world’s coral reefs from extinction? A team of scientists from the U.K. and Australia seem to think so, testing the theory that the photosynthetic rates of the flowering underwater plant can make seawater less acidic. Ocean acidification is caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide in the […]

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Development, pollution and dredging threaten seagrass more than climate change – environmentalresearchweb

Seagrass: it might not sound very exciting, but according to experts these extensive marine flowering plants form the basis of one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. In recent decades seagrass habitats have come under threat, from anthropogenic activities and climate change, and currently there is little consensus about which threats are causing the […]

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Seagrass blues | COSMOS magazine

Seagrass meadows provide homes, food and nurseries for many marine creatures, in particular serving as feeding grounds for dugongs and western rock lobsters (Panulirus Cygnus) and breeding grounds for many commercially important fish species. They are also important for water quality, filtering water and serving as an indicator of the health of the marine ecosystem, […]

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NOAA Science Helps Portuguese Identify Challenges to Seagrass Restoration

In response to a request from Portugal, researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science provided restoration guidance to a project whose goal is to shift parts of the Arrábida Natural Park back to its former seagrass-dominated landscape. Strong winter storms dramatically reduced both recovering natural seagrass beds as well as beds transplanted in […]

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Changes in Seagrass Distribution Can Help in Assessing the Success of Coastal Management in Puerto Rico

National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and Special Projects Office scientists have published a spatial analysis of changes in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Vieques Sound, east of Puerto Rico, and provided recommendations for future monitoring. SAV provides important habitat and food functions, for a wide variety of fish, invertebrates and birds, and changes in […]

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