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Manatees Are Dying in Droves, Florida Says ‘Too Bad’ I TakePart.com Environment

‘Red tide’ and a loss of sea grass account for some manatee deaths, but researchers believe undiscovered factors are also at play.  A record number of endangered manatees are dying in Florida’s waterways. So far this year, 582 manatees have died, more than any year on record, according to preliminary numbers from the Florida Fish […]

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Maps of Coral Reef Ecosystem Habitats Enhance Conservation Efforts

Since 2000, the National Ocean Service and its partners have mapped more than 3 million acres (12,100 km2) of shallow-water (0-30 meters) coral reef habitats spanning the Pacific, Atlantic and Caribbean. The results of this body of work are summarized in a new report released by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), National Summary […]

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First Florida Brown Tide Algal Bloom in Indian River and Mosquito Lagoons Confirmed

An ongoing NCCOS-funded investigation by Dr. Christopher Gobler at Stony Brook University has genetically identified the algal species Aureoumbra lagunensis as the culprit causing a brown tide bloom in east central Florida coastal lagoons. This confirms a significant expansion of brown tide harmful algal bloom (HAB) events in the United States. Previous Aureoumbra blooms had only been […]

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Algae plaguing the Indian River Lagoon was identified recently by scientists as serious trouble for fish and plants. – OrlandoSentinel.com

Scientists have preliminary confirmation that the algae clobbering vital sea grass and many kinds of popular fish in the Indian River Lagoon is a super-tiny plant with a big name that is otherwise known as “brown tide.” The algae, Aureoumbra lagunensis, is so minuscule that billions of them can grow in every quart of lagoon […]

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Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring Protocol Delivered to North Carolina Resource Managers

A recent assessment of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) monitoring programs revealed a global decline in the underwater plants’ abundance even though they are recognized worldwide for their many important ecological functions such as providing essential habitat for many commercially important species of fish, shellfish, and invertebrates. North Carolina has the third largest total area of SAV between Maine […]

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Indian River Lagoon algae: Harmful algae devastate Indian River Lagoon – Orlando Sentinel

The lagoon that hugs much of Florida’s east coast and has the richest array of marine plants, fish and wildlife in North America is under attack from the worst known outbreak of harmful algae in its history. A large portion of the Indian River Lagoon, an essential estuary for everything from manatees and sea turtles […]

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Can seagrass save the world’s coral reefs? – thestar.com

Does seagrass hold the secret to saving the world’s coral reefs from extinction? A team of scientists from the U.K. and Australia seem to think so, testing the theory that the photosynthetic rates of the flowering underwater plant can make seawater less acidic. Ocean acidification is caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide in the […]

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Development, pollution and dredging threaten seagrass more than climate change – environmentalresearchweb

Seagrass: it might not sound very exciting, but according to experts these extensive marine flowering plants form the basis of one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. In recent decades seagrass habitats have come under threat, from anthropogenic activities and climate change, and currently there is little consensus about which threats are causing the […]

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