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First Estimates of Trap Debris in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Now Available

Over 85,000 spiny lobster ghost traps and over 1 million non-fishing traps or remnants of traps are estimated to be present on the seafloor of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission calculated these estimates following completion of 151 […]

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Scientists Look at 10 Years of Data to Characterize St. John’s Coral Reefs and Fish Populations

Scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science recently integrated 10 years of baseline monitoring data (2001–2009) to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns in coral reefs and seafloor communities within and around the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument and Virgin Islands National Park. The new report also documents how these marine resources […]

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NCCOS Responds to Harmful Algal Bloom Event Threatening Florida’s Indian River Lagoon

The NCCOS Harmful Algal Bloom Event Response Program approved a request supporting rapid response to a harmful algal bloom (HAB) in the Indian River Lagoon system of East Central Florida. Dr. Chris Gobler from Stonybrook University will work with the St. Johns River Water Management District to map the extent of the 2013 Brown Tide […]

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Manatees Are Dying in Droves, Florida Says ‘Too Bad’ I TakePart.com Environment

‘Red tide’ and a loss of sea grass account for some manatee deaths, but researchers believe undiscovered factors are also at play.  A record number of endangered manatees are dying in Florida’s waterways. So far this year, 582 manatees have died, more than any year on record, according to preliminary numbers from the Florida Fish […]

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Maps of Coral Reef Ecosystem Habitats Enhance Conservation Efforts

Since 2000, the National Ocean Service and its partners have mapped more than 3 million acres (12,100 km2) of shallow-water (0-30 meters) coral reef habitats spanning the Pacific, Atlantic and Caribbean. The results of this body of work are summarized in a new report released by the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), National Summary […]

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First Florida Brown Tide Algal Bloom in Indian River and Mosquito Lagoons Confirmed

An ongoing NCCOS Event Response-funded investigation by Dr. Christopher Gobler at Stony Brook University has genetically identified the algal species Aureoumbra lagunensis as the culprit causing a brown tide bloom in east central Florida coastal lagoons. This confirms a significant expansion of brown tide harmful algal bloom (HAB) events in the United States. Previous Aureoumbra blooms had […]

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Algae plaguing the Indian River Lagoon was identified recently by scientists as serious trouble for fish and plants. – OrlandoSentinel.com

Scientists have preliminary confirmation that the algae clobbering vital sea grass and many kinds of popular fish in the Indian River Lagoon is a super-tiny plant with a big name that is otherwise known as “brown tide.” The algae, Aureoumbra lagunensis, is so minuscule that billions of them can grow in every quart of lagoon […]

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Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring Protocol Delivered to North Carolina Resource Managers

A recent assessment of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) monitoring programs revealed a global decline in the underwater plants’ abundance even though they are recognized worldwide for their many important ecological functions such as providing essential habitat for many commercially important species of fish, shellfish, and invertebrates. North Carolina has the third largest total area of SAV between Maine […]

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