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NCCOS Delivers Hard Truths on Hardened Shorelines in the Mid-Atlantic

NCCOS-sponsored researchers have found that hardened shorelines have negative effects on fish; invertebrates, such as oysters and crabs; and submerged aquatic vegetation. Shoreline hardening is an attempt to stabilize coastal land and protect residential and commercial infrastructure along the coast by building structures, like seawalls, to hold back the sea and prevent the loss of sediment. […]

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2015 Harmful Algae Cyst Cruise: Student Blog

By Eric Gulledge, Ph.D. candidate at Jackson State University I am a NOAA-Environmental Cooperative Science Center fellow and currently enrolled in the Environmental Science Ph.D. program at Jackson State University. The NOAA-ECSC strives to train and develop student’s skills related to interdisciplinary science in support of coastal management. In keeping with NOAA’s mission, NOAA-ECSC afforded […]

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NCCOS and Partners Conduct Ecological Assessment in NOAA’s Choptank Habitat Focus Area

NCCOS led a six month-long ecological assessment (EA) this year in the Tred Avon River, the largest tributary of the Choptank River in Chesapeake Bay. The Choptank River Complex is one of ten U.S. Habitat Focus Areas designated by NOAA for the purpose of concentrating agency investments and expertise at the landscape scale to improve […]

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NOAA and Partners Address Environmental Concerns of Great Lakes Commercial Net-Pen Aquaculture

A Blue Ribbon Panel of scientists from NOAA, state, and academia recently released a report addressing environmental concerns with development of a net-pen aquaculture industry in the Great Lakes.  The report, Great Lakes Net-Pen Commercial Aquaculture: A Short Summary of the Science, details many issues including the need for best management practices for operations and […]

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‘Smartphone Microscopes’ Help Provide Early Warning of Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie

Citizen scientists are using “smartphone microscopes” to identify harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. The NCCOS Phytoplankton Monitoring Network, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplied volunteers in Western Lake Erie with the new generation of “smart” microscopes, which have built-in tablets. Each smartphone tablet is pre-loaded by NCCOS scientists with “Phyto”—an application that […]

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NOAA and Navy Investigate Seasonal Cetacean Distribution In and Around St. Andrew Bay, Fla.

NCCOS researchers recently completed field work to identify the seasonal distribution and abundance of cetacean species in proximity to the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Panama City, Fla. The study—a collaboration among NCCOS, NOAA Fisheries, and the U.S. Navy—will examine whether cetacean distribution is correlated with particular environmental parameters or habitat types, which could aid future […]

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Why Nutrient-Enriched Waters Favor Large Single-Cell Algae

Ecological studies show that bottom-up (e.g., nutrient input) and top-down (e.g., grazing/predation) pressures may change the structure of aquatic ecosystems with “cascading” effects throughout the food chain. Recent research supports that zooplankton grazing in high-nutrient waters promotes the growth of larger phytoplankton over smaller species, creating a higher abundance of these larger single celled algae within the food web. Using samples […]

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Assessing Contamination in Faga’alu Bay, American Samoa

NCCOS, in collaboration with NOAA Coral Program partners, released a report assessing the pollution in Faga’alu Bay, American Samoa (a US Coral Reef Task Force priority watershed). Faga’alu is a focus area for significant interagency scientific assessment and management activities; NOAA’s field efforts were conducted simultaneously with USGS work in the watershed.  Surface sediment samples were […]

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