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NOAA Expedition Embarks to Investigate Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in the Gulf of Mexico

A NOAA-funded investigation of the relatively healthy, deep, mesophotic reefs of Pulley Ridge (off the southwest coast of Florida) begins the second leg of this summer’s expedition. From August 14-28, the University of Miami’s R/V F.G. Walton Smith will launch a surface driven remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to photograph the benthic and fish communities, as […]

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NCCOS Promotes Shellfish Aquaculture to Improve Water Quality

Researchers are exploring the role oyster aquaculture may be playing in improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. On July 16, 17, and 23, 2014,  the researchers made visits to three Chesapeake Bay oyster growers to discuss their culture practices, to view their lease areas, and to share information about this joint project. The project also  involves development […]

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NOAA Forecasts and Responds to Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom

NOAA scientists are supporting the response to a bloom of cyanobacteria that contaminated drinking water in Lake Erie on August 2nd, leaving nearly 400,000 in Toledo, OH without drinking water for two days.  NOAA’s weekly Lake Erie Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Bulletin tracks the size and location of blooms and predicts their movement until the bloom […]

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Red Tide Toxin Metabolite Accumulates in Organs, May Pose Greater Risk to Shellfish Consumers

In 2012, the state of Texas experienced the longest red tide on record, leading to a collapse of its oyster industry. Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico affect humans, wildlife, fisheries, and the regional tourist-related economy. They are caused by the harmful algae Karenia brevis, which release a neurotoxin called brevetoxin that accumulates in exposed shellfish and […]

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The National Coral Reef Monitoring Program begins “Puerto Rico” Phase

This summer, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) researchers began collecting data on coral reefs around the island of Puerto Rico to help local natural resource managers address coral reef management concerns as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program’s “Puerto Rico phase.” This program collects standardized biological, physical, and socioeconomic monitoring data […]

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Gliders Map Large Red Tide Bloom in Gulf of Mexico for Rapid Response

NCCOS is supporting the rapid deployment of self-propelled underwater robotic gliders to map an emerging red tide bloom in the Gulf of Mexico. The bloom of Karenia brevis, Florida Red Tide, was detected by an NCCOS-sponsored new modeling tool on July 23 and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) promptly issued a public red tide notice alerting the public of […]

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Puget Sound Stakeholders See Value in HAB Forecasts

At a June 26 meeting, NCCOS-funded ECOHAB project investigators concluded that climate change could increase the window of opportunity for blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium catenella to occur. In light of this information, state officials expressed strong interest in seasonal HAB forecasts, while industry and local managers requested daily to weekly forecasts. Although future climate change will […]

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New Modeling Tool Detects and Forecasts Red Tide in the Gulf of Mexico

The week of July 21, a new modeling tool based on models funded by the NCCOS Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Bloom (ECOHAB) and Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) Programs predicted and detected a Red Tide harmful algal bloom (HAB) off the West Coast of Florida. The University of South […]

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