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Assessing Invasive Asian Carp’s Potential to Spread to Great Lakes

Invasive Asian carp have established themselves in many lakes and river systems in the upper mid-West. Once established, they have wreaked havoc on existing food chains. Some of these invasive carp have been caught in Lake Erie. In anticipation of a possible invasion of the Great Lakes system, researchers from the National Centers for Coastal […]

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First Estimates of Trap Debris in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Now Available

Over 85,000 spiny lobster ghost traps and over 1 million non-fishing traps or remnants of traps are estimated to be present on the seafloor of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Researchers from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission calculated these estimates following completion of 151 […]

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Invasive Grass Carp and Impacts to Great Lakes

Non-native Grass Carp, introduced to U.S. ponds and lakes by federal and state agencies in the early 1960s, were considered a low cost, nonchemical alternative for aquatic weed control. Despite the common use of sterile Grass Carp as a biological control agent, scientists remain uncertain about the ecological risk the carp pose to North American freshwater […]

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2014 Nancy Foster Mission: Finding Fish and My ‘Sea Legs’

Notes from the scientific expedition team currently aboard the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster (March 15–April 3): Finding Fish and My “Sea Legs” by Jennifer Johnson, NOAA Hollings Scholar Guest Blogger I am a NOAA Hollings Scholar studying biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Hollings Program includes an opportunity to intern with NOAA, and, […]

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Guam Students Learn About Coastal Resilience and Conservation

Over a decade ago, fishermen in the village of Umatac (Humåtak) off the southwest coast of Guam found they were not catching the same size and quality of fish. Researchers identified one of the primary reasons to be an accelerated rate of erosion caused by the introduction of feral ungulates (pigs, goats, and deer) and […]

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Texas Alerted to Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia Bloom in Galveston Bay

Volunteers with NOAA’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network have reported a bloom of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia in Galveston Bay, Texas, and NOAA’s Analytical Response Team has confirmed that the bloom is producing domoic acid, a neurotoxin that can cause amnesiac shellfish poisoning. State managers of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Department of State Health […]

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2014 Nancy Foster Mission: Gliding Through Coral Reefs

Notes from the scientific expedition team currently aboard the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster (March 15–April 3): Spawning aggregations of reef fish in the Caribbean could be considered some of the best studied aggregations in U.S. territorial waters. But what we know about spawning aggregations is largely concentrated around a few locations in the Caribbean, particularly Grammanik […]

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2014 Nancy Foster Mission: Filling Data Gaps

Notes from the scientific expedition team currently aboard the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster (March 15–April 3): The United States Virgin Islands are home to a historic and extensive fishery, but overfishing throughout the 1970s and early 1980s has depleted numerous stocks of once abundant fish—most notably, the Nassau Grouper (Epinephelus straitus). Nassau Grouper form large spawning […]

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