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Guam Students Learn About Coastal Resilience and Conservation

Over a decade ago, fishermen in the village of Umatac (Humåtak) off the southwest coast of Guam found they were not catching the same size and quality of fish. Researchers identified one of the primary reasons to be an accelerated rate of erosion caused by the introduction of feral ungulates (pigs, goats, and deer) and […]

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Texas Alerted to Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia Bloom in Galveston Bay

Volunteers with NOAA’s Phytoplankton Monitoring Network have reported a bloom of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia in Galveston Bay, Texas, and NOAA’s Analytical Response Team has confirmed that the bloom is producing domoic acid, a neurotoxin that can cause amnesiac shellfish poisoning. State managers of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Department of State Health […]

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Working to Reduce Toxic Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Chesapeake Bay

NCCOS-sponsored researchers recently explored several promising techniques to mitigate toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms in the Chesapeake Bay region. The team focused on sediment-flocculation, in which local sediments and commercial clays are combined with the flocculating compound chitosan to sink and bury Microcystis cyanobacteria blooms. Other techniques evaluated included post-bloom flushing and early spring deployment of […]

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Can Asian Carp Barriers Protect the Great Lakes?

Invasive species such as zebra mussels have substantially changed the Great Lakes, with Asian carp poised to become the next and most serious invasive threat. Scientists leading a pioneering NCCOS-sponsored project to forecast the spread and bioeconomic impacts of aquatic invasive species have conducted an expert-based analysis of strategies to keep Asian carp out of Lake Michigan. The […]

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Common Brevetoxin Metabolite Found in Gulf of Mexico Oysters May Not be a Health Risk

Brevetoxin B2—an abundant shellfish metabolite of brevetoxin found in Gulf of Mexico oysters—does not readily pass through an intestinal barrier, rendering it unlikely to cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The B2 metabolite is produced by oysters and many other animals by attaching the amino acid cysteine to the brevetoxin that is consumed by shellfish during blooms […]

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NCCOS Helps Colombia Develop Eco-friendly Aquaculture Plan For Caribbean MPA

Commercial and artisanal fishermen of the Colombian islands of the San Andres archipelago were directly affected by the recent International Court of Justice ruling that shifted maritime borders between Colombia and Nicaragua, cutting off access to traditional fishing grounds. As a result, a new effort to develop ecologically responsible aquaculture on the islands is underway, […]

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NCCOS Expertise Used to Help “Bring Shipwrecks to Life” for Future Citizen Scientists

On August 13–14, SCUBA divers, historians, and scientists gathered at the North Carolina Aquarium in Pine Knoll Shores, NC to learn how to identify fish, algae, and invertebrates common to the coastal waters of the South Atlantic states. The workshop was part of NOAA’s “Bringing Shipwrecks to Life” program, which is designed to connect local […]

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Integrating Processes Controlling the South Florida Coastal Marine Ecosystem

NCCOS is developing a workable, ecosystem-based management approach to address the complex and inter-linked marine-estuarine-terrestrial environment in south Florida. Building on traditional Integrated Conceptual Ecosystem Models, the NCCOS-sponsored research project Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) is developing new models that incorporate positive ecosystem services instead of only negative ecosystem impacts (i.e., […]

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